Inter-hospital transport of critically ill children.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201329
Title:
Inter-hospital transport of critically ill children.
Authors:
Aherne, E; Hourihane, J
Affiliation:
Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork. emily.aherne@gmail.com
Citation:
Inter-hospital transport of critically ill children. 2009, 102 (9):288-90 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201329
PubMed ID:
19902647
Abstract:
Most Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Most Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.
MeSH:
Adolescent; Child; Child Welfare; Child, Preschool; Critical Illness; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Intensive Care Units; Intensive Care Units, Pediatric; Ireland; Male; Patient Transfer; Questionnaires; Retrospective Studies; Time Factors
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAherne, Een
dc.contributor.authorHourihane, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-10T15:16:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-10T15:16:06Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.citationInter-hospital transport of critically ill children. 2009, 102 (9):288-90 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid19902647-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/201329-
dc.descriptionMost Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.en
dc.description.abstractMost Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild Welfare-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshCritical Illness-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units-
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units, Pediatric-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPatient Transfer-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.titleInter-hospital transport of critically ill children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork. emily.aherne@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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