Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201261
Title:
Constipation in old age.
Authors:
Gallagher, Paul; O'Mahony, Denis
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. pfgallagher77@eircom.net
Citation:
Constipation in old age. 2009, 23 (6):875-87 Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol
Journal:
Best practice & research. Clinical gastroenterology
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201261
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpg.2009.09.001
PubMed ID:
19942165
Abstract:
The prevalence of constipation increases with age. However, constipation is not a physiological consequence of normal ageing. Indeed, the aetiology of constipation in older people is often multifactorial with co-morbid diseases, impaired mobility, reduced dietary fibre intake and prescription medications contributing significantly to constipation in many instances. A detailed clinical history and physical examination including digital rectal examination is usually sufficient to uncover the causes of constipation in older people; more specialized tests of anorectal physiology and colonic transit are rarely required. The scientific evidence base from which to develop specific treatment recommendations for constipation in older people is, for the most part, slim. Constipation can be complicated by faecal impaction and incontinence, particularly in frail older people with reduced mobility and cognitive impairment; preventative strategies are important in those at risk.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The prevalence of constipation increases with age. However, constipation is not a physiological consequence of normal ageing. Indeed, the aetiology of constipation in older people is often multifactorial with co-morbid diseases, impaired mobility, reduced dietary fibre intake and prescription medications contributing significantly to constipation in many instances. A detailed clinical history and physical examination including digital rectal examination is usually sufficient to uncover the causes of constipation in older people; more specialized tests of anorectal physiology and colonic transit are rarely required. The scientific evidence base from which to develop specific treatment recommendations for constipation in older people is, for the most part, slim. Constipation can be complicated by faecal impaction and incontinence, particularly in frail older people with reduced mobility and cognitive impairment; preventative strategies are important in those at risk.
MeSH:
Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aging; Combined Modality Therapy; Constipation; Defecation; Evidence-Based Medicine; Fecal Impaction; Fecal Incontinence; Female; Health Services for the Aged; Humans; Male; Predictive Value of Tests; Risk Factors; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
1532-1916

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Denisen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-10T15:14:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-10T15:14:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationConstipation in old age. 2009, 23 (6):875-87 Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterolen
dc.identifier.issn1532-1916-
dc.identifier.pmid19942165-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpg.2009.09.001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/201261-
dc.descriptionThe prevalence of constipation increases with age. However, constipation is not a physiological consequence of normal ageing. Indeed, the aetiology of constipation in older people is often multifactorial with co-morbid diseases, impaired mobility, reduced dietary fibre intake and prescription medications contributing significantly to constipation in many instances. A detailed clinical history and physical examination including digital rectal examination is usually sufficient to uncover the causes of constipation in older people; more specialized tests of anorectal physiology and colonic transit are rarely required. The scientific evidence base from which to develop specific treatment recommendations for constipation in older people is, for the most part, slim. Constipation can be complicated by faecal impaction and incontinence, particularly in frail older people with reduced mobility and cognitive impairment; preventative strategies are important in those at risk.en
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of constipation increases with age. However, constipation is not a physiological consequence of normal ageing. Indeed, the aetiology of constipation in older people is often multifactorial with co-morbid diseases, impaired mobility, reduced dietary fibre intake and prescription medications contributing significantly to constipation in many instances. A detailed clinical history and physical examination including digital rectal examination is usually sufficient to uncover the causes of constipation in older people; more specialized tests of anorectal physiology and colonic transit are rarely required. The scientific evidence base from which to develop specific treatment recommendations for constipation in older people is, for the most part, slim. Constipation can be complicated by faecal impaction and incontinence, particularly in frail older people with reduced mobility and cognitive impairment; preventative strategies are important in those at risk.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAging-
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy-
dc.subject.meshConstipation-
dc.subject.meshDefecation-
dc.subject.meshEvidence-Based Medicine-
dc.subject.meshFecal Impaction-
dc.subject.meshFecal Incontinence-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Services for the Aged-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Tests-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleConstipation in old age.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geriatric Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. pfgallagher77@eircom.neten
dc.identifier.journalBest practice & research. Clinical gastroenterologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.