The evolving role of taurolidine in cancer therapy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201260
Title:
The evolving role of taurolidine in cancer therapy.
Authors:
Neary, Peter M; Hallihan, Patrick; Wang, Jiang H; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Redmond, Henry P
Affiliation:
Department of Academic Surgery, University College Cork, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. peterneary@hotmail.com
Citation:
The evolving role of taurolidine in cancer therapy. 2010, 17 (4):1135-43 Ann. Surg. Oncol.
Journal:
Annals of surgical oncology
Issue Date:
Apr-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201260
DOI:
10.1245/s10434-009-0867-9
PubMed ID:
20039217
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: Taurolidine consists of two taurinamide rings derived from the naturally occurring amino acid taurine. It has been utilized to prevent adhesions, as an antimicrobial, and as an anti-inflammatory agent. More recently, it has been found to exert antineoplastic activity. We reviewed the literature regarding taurolidine and its role in cancer treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Taurolidine induces cancer cell death through a variety of mechanisms. Even now, all the antineoplastic pathways it employs are not completely elucidated. It has been shown to enhance apoptosis, inhibit angiogenesis, reduce tumor adherence, downregulate proinflammatory cytokine release, and stimulate anticancer immune regulation following surgical trauma. Apoptosis is activated through both a mitochondrial cytochrome-c-dependent mechanism and an extrinsic direct pathway. A lot of in vitro and animal data support taurolidine's tumoricidal action. Taurolidine has been used as an antimicrobial agent in the clinical setting since the 1970s and thus far appears nontoxic. The nontoxic nature of taurolidine makes it a favorable option compared with current chemotherapeutic regimens. Few published clinical studies exist evaluating the role of taurolidine as a chemotherapeutic agent. The literature lacks a gold-standard level 1 randomized clinical trial to evaluate taurolidine's potential antineoplastic benefits. However, these trials are currently underway. Such randomized control studies are vital to clarify the role of taurolidine in modern cancer treatment.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the associations between postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) and plasma concentrations of stable nitric oxide products [nitric oxide index (NOi)]. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Academic hospital. PATIENTS: 28 ASA physical status I, II, and III physical status patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. INTERVENTIONS: Cognitive assessment was performed preoperatively and postoperatively at 4 days (early) and 6 weeks (late). MEASUREMENTS: Serial measurements of plasma NOi were recorded. MAIN RESULTS: Early POCD with a deficit in one cognitive domain was present in 18 patients (64%), and in 8 patients (28%) with deficits in two or more cognitive domains. Late POCD was evident in three patients (20%) who had a deficit in one domain. Eight patients were lost to late follow-up. There was no difference in baseline or subsequent serum concentrations of NOi between those who showed early and late POCD and those who showed no POCD. CONCLUSION: Factors other than nitric oxide-mediated injury is responsible for POCD following major non-cardiac surgery.
MeSH:
Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Humans; Neoplasms; Taurine; Thiadiazines
ISSN:
1534-4681

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNeary, Peter Men
dc.contributor.authorHallihan, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jiang Hen
dc.contributor.authorPfirrmann, Rolf Wen
dc.contributor.authorBouchier-Hayes, David Jen
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Henry Pen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-10T14:59:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-10T14:59:48Z-
dc.date.issued2010-04-
dc.identifier.citationThe evolving role of taurolidine in cancer therapy. 2010, 17 (4):1135-43 Ann. Surg. Oncol.en
dc.identifier.issn1534-4681-
dc.identifier.pmid20039217-
dc.identifier.doi10.1245/s10434-009-0867-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/201260-
dc.descriptionSTUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the associations between postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) and plasma concentrations of stable nitric oxide products [nitric oxide index (NOi)]. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Academic hospital. PATIENTS: 28 ASA physical status I, II, and III physical status patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. INTERVENTIONS: Cognitive assessment was performed preoperatively and postoperatively at 4 days (early) and 6 weeks (late). MEASUREMENTS: Serial measurements of plasma NOi were recorded. MAIN RESULTS: Early POCD with a deficit in one cognitive domain was present in 18 patients (64%), and in 8 patients (28%) with deficits in two or more cognitive domains. Late POCD was evident in three patients (20%) who had a deficit in one domain. Eight patients were lost to late follow-up. There was no difference in baseline or subsequent serum concentrations of NOi between those who showed early and late POCD and those who showed no POCD. CONCLUSION: Factors other than nitric oxide-mediated injury is responsible for POCD following major non-cardiac surgery.en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND DESIGN: Taurolidine consists of two taurinamide rings derived from the naturally occurring amino acid taurine. It has been utilized to prevent adhesions, as an antimicrobial, and as an anti-inflammatory agent. More recently, it has been found to exert antineoplastic activity. We reviewed the literature regarding taurolidine and its role in cancer treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Taurolidine induces cancer cell death through a variety of mechanisms. Even now, all the antineoplastic pathways it employs are not completely elucidated. It has been shown to enhance apoptosis, inhibit angiogenesis, reduce tumor adherence, downregulate proinflammatory cytokine release, and stimulate anticancer immune regulation following surgical trauma. Apoptosis is activated through both a mitochondrial cytochrome-c-dependent mechanism and an extrinsic direct pathway. A lot of in vitro and animal data support taurolidine's tumoricidal action. Taurolidine has been used as an antimicrobial agent in the clinical setting since the 1970s and thus far appears nontoxic. The nontoxic nature of taurolidine makes it a favorable option compared with current chemotherapeutic regimens. Few published clinical studies exist evaluating the role of taurolidine as a chemotherapeutic agent. The literature lacks a gold-standard level 1 randomized clinical trial to evaluate taurolidine's potential antineoplastic benefits. However, these trials are currently underway. Such randomized control studies are vital to clarify the role of taurolidine in modern cancer treatment.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshTaurine-
dc.subject.meshThiadiazines-
dc.titleThe evolving role of taurolidine in cancer therapy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Academic Surgery, University College Cork, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. peterneary@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of surgical oncologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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