Sport and recreation-related injuries and fracture occurrence among emergency department attendees: implications for exercise prescription and injury prevention.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200966
Title:
Sport and recreation-related injuries and fracture occurrence among emergency department attendees: implications for exercise prescription and injury prevention.
Authors:
Falvey, E C; Eustace, J; Whelan, B; Molloy, M S; Cusack, S P; Shanahan, F; Molloy, M G
Affiliation:
Department of Rheumatology, Sports and Exercise Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. e.falvey@ireland.com
Citation:
Sport and recreation-related injuries and fracture occurrence among emergency department attendees: implications for exercise prescription and injury prevention. 2009, 26 (8):590-5 Emerg Med J
Journal:
Emergency medicine journal : EMJ
Issue Date:
Aug-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200966
DOI:
10.1136/emj.2008.062315
PubMed ID:
19625558
Abstract:
To investigate the epidemiology of sports and recreation-related injury (SRI) among emergency department (ED) attendees.; Descriptive epidemiology study.; An Irish university hospital ED.; All patients aged over 4 years attending a large regional ED, during a 6-month period, for the treatment of SRI were prospectively surveyed.; In all cases identified as SRI the attending physician completed a specifically designed questionnaire. It was postulated that recreation-related injury is a significant proportion of reported SRI.; Fracture rate was highest in the 4-9-year age group (44%). On multivariate logistic regression the adjusted odds ratio (OR; 95% CI) of fracture was higher for children (vs adults) at 1.21 (1.0 to 1.45). The adjusted OR was higher for upper-limb 5.8 (4.5 to 7.6) and lower-limb injuries 1.87 (1.4 to 2.5) versus axial site of injury and for falls 2.2 (1.6 to 2.9) and external force 1.59 (1.2 to 2.1) versus an overextension mechanism of injury. In the same model, "play" was independently associated with fracture risk, adjusted OR 1.98 (1.2 to 3.0; p = 0.001) versus low-risk ball sports 1.0 (reference); an effect size similar to that seen for combat sports 1.96 (1.2 to 3.3; p = 0.01) and greater than that seen for presumed high-risk field sports 1.4 (0.9 to 2.0); Fall and subsequent upper-limb injury was the commonest mechanism underlying SRI fracture. Domestic "play" in all age groups at the time of injury accorded a higher fracture risk than field sports. Patient education regarding the dangers of unsupervised play and recreation represents a means of reducing the burden of SRI.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the epidemiology of sports and recreation-related injury (SRI) among emergency department (ED) attendees. DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. SETTING: An Irish university hospital ED. PARTICIPANTS: All patients aged over 4 years attending a large regional ED, during a 6-month period, for the treatment of SRI were prospectively surveyed. ASSESSMENT OF RISK FACTORS: In all cases identified as SRI the attending physician completed a specifically designed questionnaire. It was postulated that recreation-related injury is a significant proportion of reported SRI. RESULTS: Fracture rate was highest in the 4-9-year age group (44%). On multivariate logistic regression the adjusted odds ratio (OR; 95% CI) of fracture was higher for children (vs adults) at 1.21 (1.0 to 1.45). The adjusted OR was higher for upper-limb 5.8 (4.5 to 7.6) and lower-limb injuries 1.87 (1.4 to 2.5) versus axial site of injury and for falls 2.2 (1.6 to 2.9) and external force 1.59 (1.2 to 2.1) versus an overextension mechanism of injury. In the same model, "play" was independently associated with fracture risk, adjusted OR 1.98 (1.2 to 3.0; p = 0.001) versus low-risk ball sports 1.0 (reference); an effect size similar to that seen for combat sports 1.96 (1.2 to 3.3; p = 0.01) and greater than that seen for presumed high-risk field sports 1.4 (0.9 to 2.0) CONCLUSION: Fall and subsequent upper-limb injury was the commonest mechanism underlying SRI fracture. Domestic "play" in all age groups at the time of injury accorded a higher fracture risk than field sports. Patient education regarding the dangers of unsupervised play and recreation represents a means of reducing the burden of SRI.
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Athletic Injuries; Child; Child, Preschool; Emergency Service, Hospital; Exercise Therapy; Female; Fractures, Bone; Humans; Ireland; Male; Prospective Studies; Recreation
ISSN:
1472-0213

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFalvey, E Cen
dc.contributor.authorEustace, Jen
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Ben
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, M Sen
dc.contributor.authorCusack, S Pen
dc.contributor.authorShanahan, Fen
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, M Gen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-09T16:25:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-09T16:25:47Z-
dc.date.issued2009-08-
dc.identifier.citationSport and recreation-related injuries and fracture occurrence among emergency department attendees: implications for exercise prescription and injury prevention. 2009, 26 (8):590-5 Emerg Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn1472-0213-
dc.identifier.pmid19625558-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/emj.2008.062315-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200966-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE: To investigate the epidemiology of sports and recreation-related injury (SRI) among emergency department (ED) attendees. DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. SETTING: An Irish university hospital ED. PARTICIPANTS: All patients aged over 4 years attending a large regional ED, during a 6-month period, for the treatment of SRI were prospectively surveyed. ASSESSMENT OF RISK FACTORS: In all cases identified as SRI the attending physician completed a specifically designed questionnaire. It was postulated that recreation-related injury is a significant proportion of reported SRI. RESULTS: Fracture rate was highest in the 4-9-year age group (44%). On multivariate logistic regression the adjusted odds ratio (OR; 95% CI) of fracture was higher for children (vs adults) at 1.21 (1.0 to 1.45). The adjusted OR was higher for upper-limb 5.8 (4.5 to 7.6) and lower-limb injuries 1.87 (1.4 to 2.5) versus axial site of injury and for falls 2.2 (1.6 to 2.9) and external force 1.59 (1.2 to 2.1) versus an overextension mechanism of injury. In the same model, "play" was independently associated with fracture risk, adjusted OR 1.98 (1.2 to 3.0; p = 0.001) versus low-risk ball sports 1.0 (reference); an effect size similar to that seen for combat sports 1.96 (1.2 to 3.3; p = 0.01) and greater than that seen for presumed high-risk field sports 1.4 (0.9 to 2.0) CONCLUSION: Fall and subsequent upper-limb injury was the commonest mechanism underlying SRI fracture. Domestic "play" in all age groups at the time of injury accorded a higher fracture risk than field sports. Patient education regarding the dangers of unsupervised play and recreation represents a means of reducing the burden of SRI.en
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the epidemiology of sports and recreation-related injury (SRI) among emergency department (ED) attendees.-
dc.description.abstractDescriptive epidemiology study.-
dc.description.abstractAn Irish university hospital ED.-
dc.description.abstractAll patients aged over 4 years attending a large regional ED, during a 6-month period, for the treatment of SRI were prospectively surveyed.-
dc.description.abstractIn all cases identified as SRI the attending physician completed a specifically designed questionnaire. It was postulated that recreation-related injury is a significant proportion of reported SRI.-
dc.description.abstractFracture rate was highest in the 4-9-year age group (44%). On multivariate logistic regression the adjusted odds ratio (OR; 95% CI) of fracture was higher for children (vs adults) at 1.21 (1.0 to 1.45). The adjusted OR was higher for upper-limb 5.8 (4.5 to 7.6) and lower-limb injuries 1.87 (1.4 to 2.5) versus axial site of injury and for falls 2.2 (1.6 to 2.9) and external force 1.59 (1.2 to 2.1) versus an overextension mechanism of injury. In the same model, "play" was independently associated with fracture risk, adjusted OR 1.98 (1.2 to 3.0; p = 0.001) versus low-risk ball sports 1.0 (reference); an effect size similar to that seen for combat sports 1.96 (1.2 to 3.3; p = 0.01) and greater than that seen for presumed high-risk field sports 1.4 (0.9 to 2.0)-
dc.description.abstractFall and subsequent upper-limb injury was the commonest mechanism underlying SRI fracture. Domestic "play" in all age groups at the time of injury accorded a higher fracture risk than field sports. Patient education regarding the dangers of unsupervised play and recreation represents a means of reducing the burden of SRI.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAthletic Injuries-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshExercise Therapy-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFractures, Bone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshRecreation-
dc.titleSport and recreation-related injuries and fracture occurrence among emergency department attendees: implications for exercise prescription and injury prevention.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Rheumatology, Sports and Exercise Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. e.falvey@ireland.comen
dc.identifier.journalEmergency medicine journal : EMJen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.