An ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200743
Title:
An ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia.
Authors:
Ajmal, Muhammad; Power, Susan; Smith, Tim; Shorten, George D
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Ireland. ajmal_c@hotmail.com
Citation:
An ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia. 2009, 26 (12):1037-42 Eur J Anaesthesiol
Journal:
European journal of anaesthesiology
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200743
DOI:
10.1097/EJA.0b013e3283317dc9
PubMed ID:
19707143
Abstract:
Ergonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis.; A data capture sheet was developed using a series of multidisciplinary expert discussions and piloted on: five procedures. The final version of this sheet was applied to 24 further procedures. Data were acquired using direct observations, video recordings and application of a questionnaire. The domains of interest were patient, operator and environmental factors related to ergonomic performance.; At least one important deficit in ergonomic performance was identified during each of the 24 procedures. None of the 24 assistants who helped to position the patients had specific training for this purpose. Eleven out of 24 operators exhibited marked (>/=60 degrees ) thoracolumbar flexion for at least a part of the procedure. Seven out of 24 operators positioned the instrument tray to their nondominant side prior to commencing the procedure. All studied patients were exposed during at least a part of the procedure at a relatively low temperature [17.5 +/- 1 degrees C (16-20.7) (mean +/- SD (range)].; In the setting described, spinal anaesthesia is usually performed in a manner which is clearly suboptimal in terms of ergonomics. This underrecognized problem needs to be addressed through education and training.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Ergonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis. METHODS: A data capture sheet was developed using a series of multidisciplinary expert discussions and piloted on: five procedures. The final version of this sheet was applied to 24 further procedures. Data were acquired using direct observations, video recordings and application of a questionnaire. The domains of interest were patient, operator and environmental factors related to ergonomic performance. RESULTS: At least one important deficit in ergonomic performance was identified during each of the 24 procedures. None of the 24 assistants who helped to position the patients had specific training for this purpose. Eleven out of 24 operators exhibited marked (>/=60 degrees ) thoracolumbar flexion for at least a part of the procedure. Seven out of 24 operators positioned the instrument tray to their nondominant side prior to commencing the procedure. All studied patients were exposed during at least a part of the procedure at a relatively low temperature [17.5 +/- 1 degrees C (16-20.7) (mean +/- SD (range)]. CONCLUSION: In the setting described, spinal anaesthesia is usually performed in a manner which is clearly suboptimal in terms of ergonomics. This underrecognized problem needs to be addressed through education and training.
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anesthesia, Spinal; Anesthesiology; Female; Human Engineering; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Occupational Health; Posture; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Task Performance and Analysis; Temperature
ISSN:
1365-2346

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAjmal, Muhammaden
dc.contributor.authorPower, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Timen
dc.contributor.authorShorten, George Den
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-06T15:38:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-06T15:38:54Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.citationAn ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia. 2009, 26 (12):1037-42 Eur J Anaesthesiolen
dc.identifier.issn1365-2346-
dc.identifier.pmid19707143-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EJA.0b013e3283317dc9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200743-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Ergonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis. METHODS: A data capture sheet was developed using a series of multidisciplinary expert discussions and piloted on: five procedures. The final version of this sheet was applied to 24 further procedures. Data were acquired using direct observations, video recordings and application of a questionnaire. The domains of interest were patient, operator and environmental factors related to ergonomic performance. RESULTS: At least one important deficit in ergonomic performance was identified during each of the 24 procedures. None of the 24 assistants who helped to position the patients had specific training for this purpose. Eleven out of 24 operators exhibited marked (>/=60 degrees ) thoracolumbar flexion for at least a part of the procedure. Seven out of 24 operators positioned the instrument tray to their nondominant side prior to commencing the procedure. All studied patients were exposed during at least a part of the procedure at a relatively low temperature [17.5 +/- 1 degrees C (16-20.7) (mean +/- SD (range)]. CONCLUSION: In the setting described, spinal anaesthesia is usually performed in a manner which is clearly suboptimal in terms of ergonomics. This underrecognized problem needs to be addressed through education and training.en
dc.description.abstractErgonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis.-
dc.description.abstractA data capture sheet was developed using a series of multidisciplinary expert discussions and piloted on: five procedures. The final version of this sheet was applied to 24 further procedures. Data were acquired using direct observations, video recordings and application of a questionnaire. The domains of interest were patient, operator and environmental factors related to ergonomic performance.-
dc.description.abstractAt least one important deficit in ergonomic performance was identified during each of the 24 procedures. None of the 24 assistants who helped to position the patients had specific training for this purpose. Eleven out of 24 operators exhibited marked (>/=60 degrees ) thoracolumbar flexion for at least a part of the procedure. Seven out of 24 operators positioned the instrument tray to their nondominant side prior to commencing the procedure. All studied patients were exposed during at least a part of the procedure at a relatively low temperature [17.5 +/- 1 degrees C (16-20.7) (mean +/- SD (range)].-
dc.description.abstractIn the setting described, spinal anaesthesia is usually performed in a manner which is clearly suboptimal in terms of ergonomics. This underrecognized problem needs to be addressed through education and training.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Spinal-
dc.subject.meshAnesthesiology-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHuman Engineering-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Health-
dc.subject.meshPosture-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshTask Performance and Analysis-
dc.subject.meshTemperature-
dc.titleAn ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Ireland. ajmal_c@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of anaesthesiologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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