The association between depression and anxiety disorders following facial trauma--a comparative study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200736
Title:
The association between depression and anxiety disorders following facial trauma--a comparative study.
Authors:
Islam, Shofiq; Ahmed, Muhiuddin; Walton, Gary M; Dinan, Timothy G; Hoffman, Gary R
Affiliation:
Dept of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Coventry & Warwickshire (UHCW), UK. drshafiqislam@hotmail.co.uk
Citation:
The association between depression and anxiety disorders following facial trauma--a comparative study. 2010, 41 (1):92-6 Injury
Journal:
Injury
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200736
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2009.07.012
PubMed ID:
19691959
Abstract:
Although the surgical care provided for patients who have sustained a maxillofacial injury has advanced in recent years, psychological disorders may develop. Anxiety and depression may be a cause of significant morbidity in these patients. Such problems are often unrecognised and untreated.; We undertook a comparative cross-sectional study in a cohort of adult patients to assess the association between traumatic facial injury and the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Study subjects were recruited during the period of June 2008 through August 2008. Fifty consecutive adult patients attending the maxillofacial outpatient clinic following facial trauma were asked to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data gathered from this group of patients were compared to 50 adult control subjects who were under follow-up following elective oral and maxillofacial surgery. We also looked at several demographic and other variables to assess its association with poor mental health outcomes.; Ten patients (20%) in the facial trauma group achieved high scores in both subscales suggesting a probable anxiety and depression state. The mean score for the depression subscale was significantly higher in the facial trauma group compared to the control group (p=0.006). The mean score for anxiety was also higher but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.07). Stratified analysis (Mantel-Haenszel) was used to control for possible confounding variables. The odds ratio for probable depression, for facial trauma patients compared with "control" patients, was 9.02, 95% CI=2.45, 33.1, p<0.001. Variables with significant associations (p<0.05) with high depression scores in the facial trauma group were female sex, presence of a permanent facial scar, and a past psychiatric history. There was also significant correlation between patients' self-perception of facial disfigurement scores and scores obtained in both anxiety subscale (r=0.41, p=0.003) and depression subscale (r=0.46, p=0.001).; Our results support the findings of previous studies and provide further evidence to clinicians for the critical identification and treatment of anxiety and depression in facial trauma victims.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
AIM: Although the surgical care provided for patients who have sustained a maxillofacial injury has advanced in recent years, psychological disorders may develop. Anxiety and depression may be a cause of significant morbidity in these patients. Such problems are often unrecognised and untreated. PATIENTS &#38; METHODS: We undertook a comparative cross-sectional study in a cohort of adult patients to assess the association between traumatic facial injury and the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Study subjects were recruited during the period of June 2008 through August 2008. Fifty consecutive adult patients attending the maxillofacial outpatient clinic following facial trauma were asked to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data gathered from this group of patients were compared to 50 adult control subjects who were under follow-up following elective oral and maxillofacial surgery. We also looked at several demographic and other variables to assess its association with poor mental health outcomes. RESULTS: Ten patients (20%) in the facial trauma group achieved high scores in both subscales suggesting a probable anxiety and depression state. The mean score for the depression subscale was significantly higher in the facial trauma group compared to the control group (p=0.006). The mean score for anxiety was also higher but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.07). Stratified analysis (Mantel-Haenszel) was used to control for possible confounding variables. The odds ratio for probable depression, for facial trauma patients compared with "control" patients, was 9.02, 95% CI=2.45, 33.1, p<0.001. Variables with significant associations (p<0.05) with high depression scores in the facial trauma group were female sex, presence of a permanent facial scar, and a past psychiatric history. There was also significant correlation between patients' self-perception of facial disfigurement scores and scores obtained in both anxiety subscale (r=0.41, p=0.003) and depression subscale (r=0.46, p=0.001). CONCLUSION: Our results support the findings of previous studies and provide further evidence to clinicians for the critical identification and treatment of anxiety and depression in facial trauma victims.
MeSH:
Adult; Anxiety Disorders; Cicatrix; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depressive Disorder; Facial Injuries; Female; Humans; Male; Odds Ratio; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Self Concept; Sex Factors
ISSN:
1879-0267

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIslam, Shofiqen
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Muhiuddinen
dc.contributor.authorWalton, Gary Men
dc.contributor.authorDinan, Timothy Gen
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Gary Ren
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-06T15:13:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-06T15:13:39Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-
dc.identifier.citationThe association between depression and anxiety disorders following facial trauma--a comparative study. 2010, 41 (1):92-6 Injuryen
dc.identifier.issn1879-0267-
dc.identifier.pmid19691959-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.injury.2009.07.012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200736-
dc.descriptionAIM: Although the surgical care provided for patients who have sustained a maxillofacial injury has advanced in recent years, psychological disorders may develop. Anxiety and depression may be a cause of significant morbidity in these patients. Such problems are often unrecognised and untreated. PATIENTS &#38; METHODS: We undertook a comparative cross-sectional study in a cohort of adult patients to assess the association between traumatic facial injury and the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Study subjects were recruited during the period of June 2008 through August 2008. Fifty consecutive adult patients attending the maxillofacial outpatient clinic following facial trauma were asked to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data gathered from this group of patients were compared to 50 adult control subjects who were under follow-up following elective oral and maxillofacial surgery. We also looked at several demographic and other variables to assess its association with poor mental health outcomes. RESULTS: Ten patients (20%) in the facial trauma group achieved high scores in both subscales suggesting a probable anxiety and depression state. The mean score for the depression subscale was significantly higher in the facial trauma group compared to the control group (p=0.006). The mean score for anxiety was also higher but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.07). Stratified analysis (Mantel-Haenszel) was used to control for possible confounding variables. The odds ratio for probable depression, for facial trauma patients compared with "control" patients, was 9.02, 95% CI=2.45, 33.1, p<0.001. Variables with significant associations (p<0.05) with high depression scores in the facial trauma group were female sex, presence of a permanent facial scar, and a past psychiatric history. There was also significant correlation between patients' self-perception of facial disfigurement scores and scores obtained in both anxiety subscale (r=0.41, p=0.003) and depression subscale (r=0.46, p=0.001). CONCLUSION: Our results support the findings of previous studies and provide further evidence to clinicians for the critical identification and treatment of anxiety and depression in facial trauma victims.en
dc.description.abstractAlthough the surgical care provided for patients who have sustained a maxillofacial injury has advanced in recent years, psychological disorders may develop. Anxiety and depression may be a cause of significant morbidity in these patients. Such problems are often unrecognised and untreated.-
dc.description.abstractWe undertook a comparative cross-sectional study in a cohort of adult patients to assess the association between traumatic facial injury and the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Study subjects were recruited during the period of June 2008 through August 2008. Fifty consecutive adult patients attending the maxillofacial outpatient clinic following facial trauma were asked to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data gathered from this group of patients were compared to 50 adult control subjects who were under follow-up following elective oral and maxillofacial surgery. We also looked at several demographic and other variables to assess its association with poor mental health outcomes.-
dc.description.abstractTen patients (20%) in the facial trauma group achieved high scores in both subscales suggesting a probable anxiety and depression state. The mean score for the depression subscale was significantly higher in the facial trauma group compared to the control group (p=0.006). The mean score for anxiety was also higher but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.07). Stratified analysis (Mantel-Haenszel) was used to control for possible confounding variables. The odds ratio for probable depression, for facial trauma patients compared with "control" patients, was 9.02, 95% CI=2.45, 33.1, p<0.001. Variables with significant associations (p<0.05) with high depression scores in the facial trauma group were female sex, presence of a permanent facial scar, and a past psychiatric history. There was also significant correlation between patients' self-perception of facial disfigurement scores and scores obtained in both anxiety subscale (r=0.41, p=0.003) and depression subscale (r=0.46, p=0.001).-
dc.description.abstractOur results support the findings of previous studies and provide further evidence to clinicians for the critical identification and treatment of anxiety and depression in facial trauma victims.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders-
dc.subject.meshCicatrix-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder-
dc.subject.meshFacial Injuries-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratio-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales-
dc.subject.meshSelf Concept-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.titleThe association between depression and anxiety disorders following facial trauma--a comparative study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDept of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Coventry & Warwickshire (UHCW), UK. drshafiqislam@hotmail.co.uken
dc.identifier.journalInjuryen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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