Pravastatin and cognitive function in the elderly. Results of the PROSPER study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200349
Title:
Pravastatin and cognitive function in the elderly. Results of the PROSPER study.
Authors:
Trompet, Stella; van Vliet, Peter; de Craen, Anton J M; Jolles, Jelle; Buckley, Brendan M; Murphy, Michael B; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J; Stott, David J; Shepherd, Jim; Bollen, Eduard L E M; Blauw, Gerard J; Jukema, J Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G J
Affiliation:
Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. s.trompet@lumc.nl
Citation:
Pravastatin and cognitive function in the elderly. Results of the PROSPER study. 2010, 257 (1):85-90 J. Neurol.
Journal:
Journal of neurology
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200349
DOI:
10.1007/s00415-009-5271-7
PubMed ID:
19653027
Abstract:
Observational studies have given conflicting results about the effect of statins in preventing dementia and cognitive decline. Moreover, observational studies are subject to prescription bias, making it hard to draw definite conclusions from them. Randomized controlled trials are therefore the preferred study design to investigate the association between statins and cognition. Here we present detailed cognitive outcomes from the randomized placebo-controlled PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Cognitive function was assessed repeatedly in all 5,804 PROSPER participants at six different time points during the study using four neuropsychological performance tests. After a mean follow-up period of 42 months, no difference in cognitive decline at any of the cognitive domains was found in subjects treated with pravastatin compared to placebo (all p > 0.05). Pravastatin treatment in old age did not affect cognitive decline during a 3 year follow-up period. Employing statin therapy in the elderly in an attempt to prevent cognitive decline therefore seems to be futile.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Observational studies have given conflicting results about the effect of statins in preventing dementia and cognitive decline. Moreover, observational studies are subject to prescription bias, making it hard to draw definite conclusions from them. Randomized controlled trials are therefore the preferred study design to investigate the association between statins and cognition. Here we present detailed cognitive outcomes from the randomized placebo-controlled PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Cognitive function was assessed repeatedly in all 5,804 PROSPER participants at six different time points during the study using four neuropsychological performance tests. After a mean follow-up period of 42 months, no difference in cognitive decline at any of the cognitive domains was found in subjects treated with pravastatin compared to placebo (all p > 0.05). Pravastatin treatment in old age did not affect cognitive decline during a 3 year follow-up period. Employing statin therapy in the elderly in an attempt to prevent cognitive decline therefore seems to be futile.
MeSH:
Aged; Aging; Anticholesteremic Agents; Cognition; Cognition Disorders; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Neuropsychological Tests; Nootropic Agents; Pravastatin; Prospective Studies; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
1432-1459

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTrompet, Stellaen
dc.contributor.authorvan Vliet, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorde Craen, Anton J Men
dc.contributor.authorJolles, Jelleen
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Brendan Men
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Michael Ben
dc.contributor.authorFord, Ianen
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, Peter Wen
dc.contributor.authorSattar, Naveeden
dc.contributor.authorPackard, Chris Jen
dc.contributor.authorStott, David Jen
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Jimen
dc.contributor.authorBollen, Eduard L E Men
dc.contributor.authorBlauw, Gerard Jen
dc.contributor.authorJukema, J Wouteren
dc.contributor.authorWestendorp, Rudi G Jen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T16:25:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T16:25:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-
dc.identifier.citationPravastatin and cognitive function in the elderly. Results of the PROSPER study. 2010, 257 (1):85-90 J. Neurol.en
dc.identifier.issn1432-1459-
dc.identifier.pmid19653027-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00415-009-5271-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200349-
dc.descriptionObservational studies have given conflicting results about the effect of statins in preventing dementia and cognitive decline. Moreover, observational studies are subject to prescription bias, making it hard to draw definite conclusions from them. Randomized controlled trials are therefore the preferred study design to investigate the association between statins and cognition. Here we present detailed cognitive outcomes from the randomized placebo-controlled PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Cognitive function was assessed repeatedly in all 5,804 PROSPER participants at six different time points during the study using four neuropsychological performance tests. After a mean follow-up period of 42 months, no difference in cognitive decline at any of the cognitive domains was found in subjects treated with pravastatin compared to placebo (all p > 0.05). Pravastatin treatment in old age did not affect cognitive decline during a 3 year follow-up period. Employing statin therapy in the elderly in an attempt to prevent cognitive decline therefore seems to be futile.en
dc.description.abstractObservational studies have given conflicting results about the effect of statins in preventing dementia and cognitive decline. Moreover, observational studies are subject to prescription bias, making it hard to draw definite conclusions from them. Randomized controlled trials are therefore the preferred study design to investigate the association between statins and cognition. Here we present detailed cognitive outcomes from the randomized placebo-controlled PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Cognitive function was assessed repeatedly in all 5,804 PROSPER participants at six different time points during the study using four neuropsychological performance tests. After a mean follow-up period of 42 months, no difference in cognitive decline at any of the cognitive domains was found in subjects treated with pravastatin compared to placebo (all p > 0.05). Pravastatin treatment in old age did not affect cognitive decline during a 3 year follow-up period. Employing statin therapy in the elderly in an attempt to prevent cognitive decline therefore seems to be futile.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAging-
dc.subject.meshAnticholesteremic Agents-
dc.subject.meshCognition-
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests-
dc.subject.meshNootropic Agents-
dc.subject.meshPravastatin-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titlePravastatin and cognitive function in the elderly. Results of the PROSPER study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. s.trompet@lumc.nlen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of neurologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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