Activation of hemostasis and decline in cognitive function in older people.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200316
Title:
Activation of hemostasis and decline in cognitive function in older people.
Authors:
Stott, David J; Robertson, Michele; Rumley, Ann; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Christopher J; Shepherd, James; Trompet, Stella; Westendorp, Rudi G J; de Craen, Anton J M; Jukema, J Wouter; Buckley, Brendan; Ford, Ian; Lowe, Gordon D O
Affiliation:
Academic Section of Geriatric Medicine, 3 Floor Queen Elizabeth Building, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER. d.j.stott@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
Citation:
Activation of hemostasis and decline in cognitive function in older people. 2010, 30 (3):605-11 Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
Journal:
Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
Issue Date:
Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200316
DOI:
10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.199448
PubMed ID:
20032290
Additional Links:
http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/30/3/605.full.pdf+html
Abstract:
To determine whether activation of hemostatic function (thrombosis and fibrinolysis) is associated with cognitive decline in older people.; We studied 5804 people (age, 70-82 years) in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Mean follow-up was 3.2 years, including annual measurement of speed of information processing (letter, digit coding, and Stroop), verbal memory (picture-word naming), and basic and instrumental activities of daily living. Raised levels of markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) were associated independently with increased rate of cognitive decline (eg, Stroop increased by 4.44 s [SEM, 0.68] in bottom tertile of d-dimer compared to 5.46 [SEM, 0.71] in highest tertile; P<0.05) and deterioration in activities of daily living. This increased rate of decline was attenuated but not removed when subjects with incident nonfatal stroke were omitted from the analysis. It also persisted when adjustments were made for inflammation (C-reactive protein and IL-6).; Older patients with increased markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) are at increased risk for cognitive decline and deterioration in ability to perform activities of daily living. This is likely attributable to increased risk of cerebral ischemic damage (including covert disease) associated with prothrombotic states.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether activation of hemostatic function (thrombosis and fibrinolysis) is associated with cognitive decline in older people. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 5804 people (age, 70-82 years) in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Mean follow-up was 3.2 years, including annual measurement of speed of information processing (letter, digit coding, and Stroop), verbal memory (picture-word naming), and basic and instrumental activities of daily living. Raised levels of markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) were associated independently with increased rate of cognitive decline (eg, Stroop increased by 4.44 s [SEM, 0.68] in bottom tertile of d-dimer compared to 5.46 [SEM, 0.71] in highest tertile; P<0.05) and deterioration in activities of daily living. This increased rate of decline was attenuated but not removed when subjects with incident nonfatal stroke were omitted from the analysis. It also persisted when adjustments were made for inflammation (C-reactive protein and IL-6). CONCLUSIONS: Older patients with increased markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) are at increased risk for cognitive decline and deterioration in ability to perform activities of daily living. This is likely attributable to increased risk of cerebral ischemic damage (including covert disease) associated with prothrombotic states.
MeSH:
Activities of Daily Living; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Biological Markers; Cognition; Cognition Disorders; Dementia, Vascular; Female; Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products; Fibrinogen; Follow-Up Studies; Hemostasis; Humans; Male; Prothrombin; Risk Factors
ISSN:
1524-4636

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStott, David Jen
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Micheleen
dc.contributor.authorRumley, Annen
dc.contributor.authorWelsh, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorSattar, Naveeden
dc.contributor.authorPackard, Christopher Jen
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorTrompet, Stellaen
dc.contributor.authorWestendorp, Rudi G Jen
dc.contributor.authorde Craen, Anton J Men
dc.contributor.authorJukema, J Wouteren
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Brendanen
dc.contributor.authorFord, Ianen
dc.contributor.authorLowe, Gordon D Oen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T14:49:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T14:49:51Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.citationActivation of hemostasis and decline in cognitive function in older people. 2010, 30 (3):605-11 Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn1524-4636-
dc.identifier.pmid20032290-
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.199448-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200316-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE: To determine whether activation of hemostatic function (thrombosis and fibrinolysis) is associated with cognitive decline in older people. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 5804 people (age, 70-82 years) in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Mean follow-up was 3.2 years, including annual measurement of speed of information processing (letter, digit coding, and Stroop), verbal memory (picture-word naming), and basic and instrumental activities of daily living. Raised levels of markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) were associated independently with increased rate of cognitive decline (eg, Stroop increased by 4.44 s [SEM, 0.68] in bottom tertile of d-dimer compared to 5.46 [SEM, 0.71] in highest tertile; P<0.05) and deterioration in activities of daily living. This increased rate of decline was attenuated but not removed when subjects with incident nonfatal stroke were omitted from the analysis. It also persisted when adjustments were made for inflammation (C-reactive protein and IL-6). CONCLUSIONS: Older patients with increased markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) are at increased risk for cognitive decline and deterioration in ability to perform activities of daily living. This is likely attributable to increased risk of cerebral ischemic damage (including covert disease) associated with prothrombotic states.en
dc.description.abstractTo determine whether activation of hemostatic function (thrombosis and fibrinolysis) is associated with cognitive decline in older people.-
dc.description.abstractWe studied 5804 people (age, 70-82 years) in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Mean follow-up was 3.2 years, including annual measurement of speed of information processing (letter, digit coding, and Stroop), verbal memory (picture-word naming), and basic and instrumental activities of daily living. Raised levels of markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) were associated independently with increased rate of cognitive decline (eg, Stroop increased by 4.44 s [SEM, 0.68] in bottom tertile of d-dimer compared to 5.46 [SEM, 0.71] in highest tertile; P<0.05) and deterioration in activities of daily living. This increased rate of decline was attenuated but not removed when subjects with incident nonfatal stroke were omitted from the analysis. It also persisted when adjustments were made for inflammation (C-reactive protein and IL-6).-
dc.description.abstractOlder patients with increased markers of thrombin generation (d-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1+2) are at increased risk for cognitive decline and deterioration in ability to perform activities of daily living. This is likely attributable to increased risk of cerebral ischemic damage (including covert disease) associated with prothrombotic states.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/30/3/605.full.pdf+htmlen
dc.subject.meshActivities of Daily Living-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshCognition-
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders-
dc.subject.meshDementia, Vascular-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products-
dc.subject.meshFibrinogen-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHemostasis-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshProthrombin-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.titleActivation of hemostasis and decline in cognitive function in older people.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAcademic Section of Geriatric Medicine, 3 Floor Queen Elizabeth Building, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER. d.j.stott@clinmed.gla.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalArteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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