Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200279
Title:
Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?
Authors:
Murphy, D M; Forrest, I A; Curran, D; Ward, C
Affiliation:
Cork University Hospital, The Department of Respiratory Medicine, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. desmond.murphy@hse.ie
Citation:
Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects? 2010, 19 (3):401-14 Expert Opin Investig Drugs
Journal:
Expert opinion on investigational drugs
Issue Date:
Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200279
DOI:
10.1517/13543781003636480
PubMed ID:
20151856
Abstract:
The macrolides are a class of antibiotics widely prescribed in infectious disease. More recently, there has been considerable interest in potential indications for these agents, in addition to their simple antibacterial indications, in a number of lung pathophysiologies.; Demonstrated clinical efficacy of macrolides in diseases such as diffuse panbronchiolitis was difficult to ascribe to a direct antimicrobial action. More recently, positive experiences in dealing with post-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome suggests that other chronic lung diseases may benefit from macrolide therapy. This is important, as the treatment options for such diseases are often very limited. In this review, potential antibiotic and non-antibiotic beneficial actions of macrolide therapy are discussed and conclusions drawn from a limited but growing literature.; The reader will gain an overview of lung diseases that may benefit from macrolides, and a consideration of the possible mechanisms underlying such benefit.; The key message from our review is that this class of agents may prove to be a useful therapeutic option for a range of respiratory diseases, but that further trials and mechanistic studies are required to clarify their role.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Different crystallins (alpha, beta H, beta L and LMW) were isolated from bovine lenses. Lyophilized samples of single components (homoaggregates) and those of mixtures (heteroaggregates) were exposed to HCI vapor in a high vacuum vapor sorption apparatus. Lyophilized 5-microns sections of bovine lens were similarly exposed to HCI vapors. Sorption and desorption isotherms were obtained at two temperatures on all samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT IR) spectroscopy was conducted on solid samples of crystallin with and without irreversibly sorbed HCI gas. From the IR spectra the nature of interaction between HCI and protein were ascertained. From the sorption parameters, mainly from the irreversibly sorbed HCI, the accessibilities of homo and hetero aggregates were calculated. The accessibilities provided information on the preferential interactions among crystallins. One of the main conclusions derived from this and also from previous ammonia sorption studies is that the supramolecular organization in the lens fibers is not governed solely by the thermodynamically preferential interactions of crystallins, but also by other possibly cytoskeletal organizations of crystallins.
MeSH:
Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bronchiolitis Obliterans; Humans; Lung Diseases; Lung Transplantation; Macrolides
ISSN:
1744-7658

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, D Men
dc.contributor.authorForrest, I Aen
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Den
dc.contributor.authorWard, Cen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T14:41:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T14:41:32Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.citationMacrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects? 2010, 19 (3):401-14 Expert Opin Investig Drugsen
dc.identifier.issn1744-7658-
dc.identifier.pmid20151856-
dc.identifier.doi10.1517/13543781003636480-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200279-
dc.descriptionDifferent crystallins (alpha, beta H, beta L and LMW) were isolated from bovine lenses. Lyophilized samples of single components (homoaggregates) and those of mixtures (heteroaggregates) were exposed to HCI vapor in a high vacuum vapor sorption apparatus. Lyophilized 5-microns sections of bovine lens were similarly exposed to HCI vapors. Sorption and desorption isotherms were obtained at two temperatures on all samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT IR) spectroscopy was conducted on solid samples of crystallin with and without irreversibly sorbed HCI gas. From the IR spectra the nature of interaction between HCI and protein were ascertained. From the sorption parameters, mainly from the irreversibly sorbed HCI, the accessibilities of homo and hetero aggregates were calculated. The accessibilities provided information on the preferential interactions among crystallins. One of the main conclusions derived from this and also from previous ammonia sorption studies is that the supramolecular organization in the lens fibers is not governed solely by the thermodynamically preferential interactions of crystallins, but also by other possibly cytoskeletal organizations of crystallins.en
dc.description.abstractThe macrolides are a class of antibiotics widely prescribed in infectious disease. More recently, there has been considerable interest in potential indications for these agents, in addition to their simple antibacterial indications, in a number of lung pathophysiologies.-
dc.description.abstractDemonstrated clinical efficacy of macrolides in diseases such as diffuse panbronchiolitis was difficult to ascribe to a direct antimicrobial action. More recently, positive experiences in dealing with post-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome suggests that other chronic lung diseases may benefit from macrolide therapy. This is important, as the treatment options for such diseases are often very limited. In this review, potential antibiotic and non-antibiotic beneficial actions of macrolide therapy are discussed and conclusions drawn from a limited but growing literature.-
dc.description.abstractThe reader will gain an overview of lung diseases that may benefit from macrolides, and a consideration of the possible mechanisms underlying such benefit.-
dc.description.abstractThe key message from our review is that this class of agents may prove to be a useful therapeutic option for a range of respiratory diseases, but that further trials and mechanistic studies are required to clarify their role.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents-
dc.subject.meshBronchiolitis Obliterans-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLung Diseases-
dc.subject.meshLung Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshMacrolides-
dc.titleMacrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, The Department of Respiratory Medicine, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. desmond.murphy@hse.ieen
dc.identifier.journalExpert opinion on investigational drugsen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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