Phase I/II safety study of transfusion of prion-filtered red cell concentrates in transfusion-dependent patients.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200261
Title:
Phase I/II safety study of transfusion of prion-filtered red cell concentrates in transfusion-dependent patients.
Authors:
Cahill, M R; Murphy, T; Khan, M; Fagan, J; Murphy, W G
Affiliation:
Department of Haematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. maryr.cahill@hse.ie
Citation:
Phase I/II safety study of transfusion of prion-filtered red cell concentrates in transfusion-dependent patients. 2010, 99 (2):174-6 Vox Sang.
Journal:
Vox sanguinis
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200261
DOI:
10.1111/j.1423-0410.2010.01330.x
PubMed ID:
20345513
Abstract:
Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) is a fatal transfusion transmissible prion infection. No test for vCJD in the donor population is currently available. Therefore, prion removal by filtration of red cell concentrate (RCC) is an attractive option for prevention.; Twenty patients were recruited with ethical permission, to receive clinically necessary transfusion containing one unit of pfRCC. Follow-up at 24 hours, 6 weeks and 6 months was undertaken. A second pfRCC was administered to 6 patients with similar follow up. pfRCC were prepared using the CE marked P-Capt device by the IBTS.; In 20 transfused patients undergoing one exposure to a prion filtered unit, no attributable adverse events were noted. A subset of these (n = 6) underwent re-exposure to a further filtered unit without incident.; This phase 1/11 clinical study provides encouraging data on safety of prion filtration which can be used to plan more extensive studies on the use of filtered blood in adults and children.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) is a fatal transfusion transmissible prion infection. No test for vCJD in the donor population is currently available. Therefore, prion removal by filtration of red cell concentrate (RCC) is an attractive option for prevention. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients were recruited with ethical permission, to receive clinically necessary transfusion containing one unit of pfRCC. Follow-up at 24 hours, 6 weeks and 6 months was undertaken. A second pfRCC was administered to 6 patients with similar follow up. pfRCC were prepared using the CE marked P-Capt device by the IBTS. RESULTS: In 20 transfused patients undergoing one exposure to a prion filtered unit, no attributable adverse events were noted. A subset of these (n = 6) underwent re-exposure to a further filtered unit without incident. CONCLUSIONS: This phase 1/11 clinical study provides encouraging data on safety of prion filtration which can be used to plan more extensive studies on the use of filtered blood in adults and children.
MeSH:
Adult; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome; Erythrocyte Transfusion; Erythrocytes; Hemofiltration; Humans; Prions
ISSN:
1423-0410

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCahill, M Ren
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Ten
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Men
dc.contributor.authorFagan, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, W Gen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T12:32:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T12:32:20Z-
dc.date.issued2010-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationPhase I/II safety study of transfusion of prion-filtered red cell concentrates in transfusion-dependent patients. 2010, 99 (2):174-6 Vox Sang.en
dc.identifier.issn1423-0410-
dc.identifier.pmid20345513-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1423-0410.2010.01330.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200261-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) is a fatal transfusion transmissible prion infection. No test for vCJD in the donor population is currently available. Therefore, prion removal by filtration of red cell concentrate (RCC) is an attractive option for prevention. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients were recruited with ethical permission, to receive clinically necessary transfusion containing one unit of pfRCC. Follow-up at 24 hours, 6 weeks and 6 months was undertaken. A second pfRCC was administered to 6 patients with similar follow up. pfRCC were prepared using the CE marked P-Capt device by the IBTS. RESULTS: In 20 transfused patients undergoing one exposure to a prion filtered unit, no attributable adverse events were noted. A subset of these (n = 6) underwent re-exposure to a further filtered unit without incident. CONCLUSIONS: This phase 1/11 clinical study provides encouraging data on safety of prion filtration which can be used to plan more extensive studies on the use of filtered blood in adults and children.en
dc.description.abstractVariant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) is a fatal transfusion transmissible prion infection. No test for vCJD in the donor population is currently available. Therefore, prion removal by filtration of red cell concentrate (RCC) is an attractive option for prevention.-
dc.description.abstractTwenty patients were recruited with ethical permission, to receive clinically necessary transfusion containing one unit of pfRCC. Follow-up at 24 hours, 6 weeks and 6 months was undertaken. A second pfRCC was administered to 6 patients with similar follow up. pfRCC were prepared using the CE marked P-Capt device by the IBTS.-
dc.description.abstractIn 20 transfused patients undergoing one exposure to a prion filtered unit, no attributable adverse events were noted. A subset of these (n = 6) underwent re-exposure to a further filtered unit without incident.-
dc.description.abstractThis phase 1/11 clinical study provides encouraging data on safety of prion filtration which can be used to plan more extensive studies on the use of filtered blood in adults and children.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCreutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome-
dc.subject.meshErythrocyte Transfusion-
dc.subject.meshErythrocytes-
dc.subject.meshHemofiltration-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshPrions-
dc.titlePhase I/II safety study of transfusion of prion-filtered red cell concentrates in transfusion-dependent patients.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Haematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. maryr.cahill@hse.ieen
dc.identifier.journalVox sanguinisen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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