A review of the use of common antiplatelet agents in orthopaedic practice.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200258
Title:
A review of the use of common antiplatelet agents in orthopaedic practice.
Authors:
Dineen, P F; Curtin, R J; Harty, J A
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedics, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Republic of Ireland. patdineen@hotmail.com
Citation:
A review of the use of common antiplatelet agents in orthopaedic practice. 2010, 92 (9):1186-91 J Bone Joint Surg Br
Journal:
The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume
Issue Date:
Sep-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200258
DOI:
10.1302/0301-620X.92B9.24765
PubMed ID:
20798432
Abstract:
Antiplatelet agents are widely prescribed for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. A common clinical problem facing orthopaedic and trauma surgeons is how to manage patients receiving these agents who require surgery, either electively or following trauma. The dilemma is to balance the risk of increased blood loss if the antiplatelet agents are continued peri-operatively against the risk of coronary artery/stent thrombosis and/or other vascular event if the drugs are stopped. The traditional approach of stopping these medications up to two weeks before surgery appears to pose significant danger to patients and may require review. This paper covers the important aspects regarding the two most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agents, aspirin and clopidogrel.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Antiplatelet agents are widely prescribed for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. A common clinical problem facing orthopaedic and trauma surgeons is how to manage patients receiving these agents who require surgery, either electively or following trauma. The dilemma is to balance the risk of increased blood loss if the antiplatelet agents are continued peri-operatively against the risk of coronary artery/stent thrombosis and/or other vascular event if the drugs are stopped. The traditional approach of stopping these medications up to two weeks before surgery appears to pose significant danger to patients and may require review. This paper covers the important aspects regarding the two most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agents, aspirin and clopidogrel.
MeSH:
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary; Aspirin; Cardiovascular Diseases; Drug Therapy, Combination; Humans; Orthopedics; Perioperative Care; Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors; Preoperative Care; Stents; Thrombosis; Ticlopidine
ISSN:
0301-620X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDineen, P Fen
dc.contributor.authorCurtin, R Jen
dc.contributor.authorHarty, J Aen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T12:27:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T12:27:37Z-
dc.date.issued2010-09-
dc.identifier.citationA review of the use of common antiplatelet agents in orthopaedic practice. 2010, 92 (9):1186-91 J Bone Joint Surg Bren
dc.identifier.issn0301-620X-
dc.identifier.pmid20798432-
dc.identifier.doi10.1302/0301-620X.92B9.24765-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200258-
dc.descriptionAntiplatelet agents are widely prescribed for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. A common clinical problem facing orthopaedic and trauma surgeons is how to manage patients receiving these agents who require surgery, either electively or following trauma. The dilemma is to balance the risk of increased blood loss if the antiplatelet agents are continued peri-operatively against the risk of coronary artery/stent thrombosis and/or other vascular event if the drugs are stopped. The traditional approach of stopping these medications up to two weeks before surgery appears to pose significant danger to patients and may require review. This paper covers the important aspects regarding the two most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agents, aspirin and clopidogrel.en
dc.description.abstractAntiplatelet agents are widely prescribed for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. A common clinical problem facing orthopaedic and trauma surgeons is how to manage patients receiving these agents who require surgery, either electively or following trauma. The dilemma is to balance the risk of increased blood loss if the antiplatelet agents are continued peri-operatively against the risk of coronary artery/stent thrombosis and/or other vascular event if the drugs are stopped. The traditional approach of stopping these medications up to two weeks before surgery appears to pose significant danger to patients and may require review. This paper covers the important aspects regarding the two most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agents, aspirin and clopidogrel.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAngioplasty, Balloon, Coronary-
dc.subject.meshAspirin-
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases-
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy, Combination-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshOrthopedics-
dc.subject.meshPerioperative Care-
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Aggregation Inhibitors-
dc.subject.meshPreoperative Care-
dc.subject.meshStents-
dc.subject.meshThrombosis-
dc.subject.meshTiclopidine-
dc.titleA review of the use of common antiplatelet agents in orthopaedic practice.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopaedics, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Republic of Ireland. patdineen@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volumeen
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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