Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200252
Title:
Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland.
Authors:
Ojo, Olabisi O; Sheehan, Stella; Corcoran, Daniel G; Nikolayevsky, Vladyslav; Brown, Timothy; O'Sullivan, Margaret; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Gordon, Stephen V; Drobniewski, Francis; Prentice, Michael B
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland. 2010, 10 (7):1110-6 Infect. Genet. Evol.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases
Issue Date:
Oct-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200252
DOI:
10.1016/j.meegid.2010.07.008
PubMed ID:
20637901
Abstract:
Tuberculosis has had significant effects on Ireland over the past two centuries, causing persistently higher morbidity and mortality than in neighbouring countries until the last decade. This study describes the results of genotyping and drug susceptibility testing of 171 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated between January 2004 and December 2006 in a region of Ireland centred on the city of Cork. Spoligotype comparisons were made with the SpolDB4 database and clustered 130 strains in 23 groups, forty-one strains showed unique Spoligotyping patterns. The commonest spoligotypes detected were ST0137 (X2) (16.9%), and ST0351 (15.8%) ('U' clade). The major spoligotype clades were X (26.2%), U (19.3%), T (15.2%), Beijing (5.9%), Haarlem (4.7%), LAM (4.1%), BOVIS (1.75%), with 12.9% unassigned strains. A 24-locus VNTR genotyping produced 15 clusters containing 49 isolates, with high discrimination index (HGDI>0.99). A combination of Spoligotyping and VNTR reduced the number of clustered isolates to 47 in 15 clusters (27.5%). This study identified ST351 as common among Irish nationals, and found a low rate of drug resistance with little evidence of transmission of drug resistant strains. Strain clustering was significantly associated with age under 55 years and Irish nationality. Only strains of Euro-American lineage formed clusters. Molecular typing did not completely coincide with the results of contact investigations.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Bacterial Typing Techniques; Cluster Analysis; Humans; Ireland; Middle Aged; Molecular Epidemiology; Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Tuberculosis
ISSN:
1567-7257

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOjo, Olabisi Oen
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, Stellaen
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, Daniel Gen
dc.contributor.authorNikolayevsky, Vladyslaven
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Timothyen
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Margareten
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Kathleenen
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Stephen Ven
dc.contributor.authorDrobniewski, Francisen
dc.contributor.authorPrentice, Michael Ben
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T11:57:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T11:57:14Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-
dc.identifier.citationMolecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland. 2010, 10 (7):1110-6 Infect. Genet. Evol.en
dc.identifier.issn1567-7257-
dc.identifier.pmid20637901-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.meegid.2010.07.008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200252-
dc.description.abstractTuberculosis has had significant effects on Ireland over the past two centuries, causing persistently higher morbidity and mortality than in neighbouring countries until the last decade. This study describes the results of genotyping and drug susceptibility testing of 171 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated between January 2004 and December 2006 in a region of Ireland centred on the city of Cork. Spoligotype comparisons were made with the SpolDB4 database and clustered 130 strains in 23 groups, forty-one strains showed unique Spoligotyping patterns. The commonest spoligotypes detected were ST0137 (X2) (16.9%), and ST0351 (15.8%) ('U' clade). The major spoligotype clades were X (26.2%), U (19.3%), T (15.2%), Beijing (5.9%), Haarlem (4.7%), LAM (4.1%), BOVIS (1.75%), with 12.9% unassigned strains. A 24-locus VNTR genotyping produced 15 clusters containing 49 isolates, with high discrimination index (HGDI>0.99). A combination of Spoligotyping and VNTR reduced the number of clustered isolates to 47 in 15 clusters (27.5%). This study identified ST351 as common among Irish nationals, and found a low rate of drug resistance with little evidence of transmission of drug resistant strains. Strain clustering was significantly associated with age under 55 years and Irish nationality. Only strains of Euro-American lineage formed clusters. Molecular typing did not completely coincide with the results of contact investigations.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniques-
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysis-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshMolecular Epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium tuberculosis-
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis-
dc.titleMolecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalInfection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseasesen
dc.description.provinceMunster-
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.