Severity of acute pain after breast surgery is associated with the likelihood of subsequently developing persistent pain.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200241
Title:
Severity of acute pain after breast surgery is associated with the likelihood of subsequently developing persistent pain.
Authors:
Hickey, Oonagh T; Burke, Siun M; Hafeez, Parvaiz; Mudrakouski, Aliaksandr L; Hayes, Ivan D; Shorten, George D
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Wilton, Ireland. oonaghhickey@yahoo.co.uk
Citation:
Severity of acute pain after breast surgery is associated with the likelihood of subsequently developing persistent pain. 2010, 26 (7):556-60 Clin J Pain
Journal:
The Clinical journal of pain
Issue Date:
Sep-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200241
DOI:
10.1097/AJP.0b013e3181dee988
PubMed ID:
20639740
Abstract:
Persistent postsurgical pain (PPSP) after surgery for breast cancer has a prevalence of 20% to 52%. Neuroplastic changes may play a role in the aetiology of this pain. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between acute pain after surgery for breast cancer and the likelihood of subsequently developing PPSP.; Twenty-eight women undergoing surgery for breast cancer completed visual analogue scales for pain and anxiety, the McGill Pain Questionnaire (long form) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Analgesic requirements and adverse effects of analgesic therapy were noted. Quantitative sensory testing was carried out perioperatively using an electrical stimulus, and the sensation perception, pain perception, and pain tolerance thresholds were measured bilaterally at the T4 dermatomes and at the contralateral L5 dermatome. Patients with and without PPSP 3 months postoperatively were compared in terms of these parameters.; Eight participants (28.6%) reported PPSP. Those who subsequently developed PPSP reported greater pain scores on the McGill Pain Questionnaire 5 days postoperatively than those that did not (pain rating index, P=0.014; present pain intensity, P=0.032). None had sought medical attention for their persistent pain. Patients with and without PPSP were similar in terms of mental status (anxiety and depression), analgesic consumption, adverse effects of analgesic therapy, and changes on QST.; Patients who developed PPSP experienced pain of greater intensity on the fifth postoperative day than those that did not.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVES: Persistent postsurgical pain (PPSP) after surgery for breast cancer has a prevalence of 20% to 52%. Neuroplastic changes may play a role in the aetiology of this pain. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between acute pain after surgery for breast cancer and the likelihood of subsequently developing PPSP. METHODS: Twenty-eight women undergoing surgery for breast cancer completed visual analogue scales for pain and anxiety, the McGill Pain Questionnaire (long form) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Analgesic requirements and adverse effects of analgesic therapy were noted. Quantitative sensory testing was carried out perioperatively using an electrical stimulus, and the sensation perception, pain perception, and pain tolerance thresholds were measured bilaterally at the T4 dermatomes and at the contralateral L5 dermatome. Patients with and without PPSP 3 months postoperatively were compared in terms of these parameters. RESULTS: Eight participants (28.6%) reported PPSP. Those who subsequently developed PPSP reported greater pain scores on the McGill Pain Questionnaire 5 days postoperatively than those that did not (pain rating index, P=0.014; present pain intensity, P=0.032). None had sought medical attention for their persistent pain. Patients with and without PPSP were similar in terms of mental status (anxiety and depression), analgesic consumption, adverse effects of analgesic therapy, and changes on QST. DISCUSSION: Patients who developed PPSP experienced pain of greater intensity on the fifth postoperative day than those that did not.
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Anxiety; Breast; Breast Neoplasms; Chronic Disease; Depression; Female; Humans; Mastectomy; Middle Aged; Pain Measurement; Pain Threshold; Pain, Postoperative; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Questionnaires; Severity of Illness Index
ISSN:
1536-5409

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Oonagh Ten
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Siun Men
dc.contributor.authorHafeez, Parvaizen
dc.contributor.authorMudrakouski, Aliaksandr Len
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Ivan Den
dc.contributor.authorShorten, George Den
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T12:22:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T12:22:32Z-
dc.date.issued2010-09-
dc.identifier.citationSeverity of acute pain after breast surgery is associated with the likelihood of subsequently developing persistent pain. 2010, 26 (7):556-60 Clin J Painen
dc.identifier.issn1536-5409-
dc.identifier.pmid20639740-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/AJP.0b013e3181dee988-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200241-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVES: Persistent postsurgical pain (PPSP) after surgery for breast cancer has a prevalence of 20% to 52%. Neuroplastic changes may play a role in the aetiology of this pain. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between acute pain after surgery for breast cancer and the likelihood of subsequently developing PPSP. METHODS: Twenty-eight women undergoing surgery for breast cancer completed visual analogue scales for pain and anxiety, the McGill Pain Questionnaire (long form) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Analgesic requirements and adverse effects of analgesic therapy were noted. Quantitative sensory testing was carried out perioperatively using an electrical stimulus, and the sensation perception, pain perception, and pain tolerance thresholds were measured bilaterally at the T4 dermatomes and at the contralateral L5 dermatome. Patients with and without PPSP 3 months postoperatively were compared in terms of these parameters. RESULTS: Eight participants (28.6%) reported PPSP. Those who subsequently developed PPSP reported greater pain scores on the McGill Pain Questionnaire 5 days postoperatively than those that did not (pain rating index, P=0.014; present pain intensity, P=0.032). None had sought medical attention for their persistent pain. Patients with and without PPSP were similar in terms of mental status (anxiety and depression), analgesic consumption, adverse effects of analgesic therapy, and changes on QST. DISCUSSION: Patients who developed PPSP experienced pain of greater intensity on the fifth postoperative day than those that did not.en
dc.description.abstractPersistent postsurgical pain (PPSP) after surgery for breast cancer has a prevalence of 20% to 52%. Neuroplastic changes may play a role in the aetiology of this pain. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between acute pain after surgery for breast cancer and the likelihood of subsequently developing PPSP.-
dc.description.abstractTwenty-eight women undergoing surgery for breast cancer completed visual analogue scales for pain and anxiety, the McGill Pain Questionnaire (long form) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Analgesic requirements and adverse effects of analgesic therapy were noted. Quantitative sensory testing was carried out perioperatively using an electrical stimulus, and the sensation perception, pain perception, and pain tolerance thresholds were measured bilaterally at the T4 dermatomes and at the contralateral L5 dermatome. Patients with and without PPSP 3 months postoperatively were compared in terms of these parameters.-
dc.description.abstractEight participants (28.6%) reported PPSP. Those who subsequently developed PPSP reported greater pain scores on the McGill Pain Questionnaire 5 days postoperatively than those that did not (pain rating index, P=0.014; present pain intensity, P=0.032). None had sought medical attention for their persistent pain. Patients with and without PPSP were similar in terms of mental status (anxiety and depression), analgesic consumption, adverse effects of analgesic therapy, and changes on QST.-
dc.description.abstractPatients who developed PPSP experienced pain of greater intensity on the fifth postoperative day than those that did not.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAnxiety-
dc.subject.meshBreast-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshChronic Disease-
dc.subject.meshDepression-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMastectomy-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement-
dc.subject.meshPain Threshold-
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperative-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Index-
dc.titleSeverity of acute pain after breast surgery is associated with the likelihood of subsequently developing persistent pain.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Wilton, Ireland. oonaghhickey@yahoo.co.uken
dc.identifier.journalThe Clinical journal of painen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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