Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200236
Title:
Imaging of hematuria.
Authors:
O'Connor, Owen J; Fitzgerald, Edward; Maher, Michael M
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Imaging of hematuria. 2010, 195 (4):W263-7 AJR Am J Roentgenol
Journal:
AJR. American journal of roentgenology
Issue Date:
Oct-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200236
DOI:
10.2214/AJR.09.4181
PubMed ID:
20858787
Additional Links:
http://www.ajronline.org/content/195/4/W263.full.pdf+html
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: In this article, we will discuss the current status of imaging in patients with hematuria of urologic origin. Issues impacting evaluation of these patients with radiography, excretory urography, retrograde pyelography, and sonography will be discussed. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography has no role in the detection of renal or urothelial carcinoma. Low-dose CT offers much greater sensitivities for the detection of urinary tract calculi than radiography at doses equivalent to conventional radiography. Ultrasound alone is insufficient for imaging of hematuria. Using ultrasound alone, it is often difficult to differentiate renal transitional cell carcinoma from other causes of filling defects of the renal collecting system such as blood clots, sloughed papillae, or fungus balls. The prominence of the role of excretory urography in the evaluation of patients with hematuria has diminished, and MDCT urography is now preferred to excretory urography in most cases.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE: In this article, we will discuss the current status of imaging in patients with hematuria of urologic origin. Issues impacting evaluation of these patients with radiography, excretory urography, retrograde pyelography, and sonography will be discussed. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography has no role in the detection of renal or urothelial carcinoma. Low-dose CT offers much greater sensitivities for the detection of urinary tract calculi than radiography at doses equivalent to conventional radiography. Ultrasound alone is insufficient for imaging of hematuria. Using ultrasound alone, it is often difficult to differentiate renal transitional cell carcinoma from other causes of filling defects of the renal collecting system such as blood clots, sloughed papillae, or fungus balls. The prominence of the role of excretory urography in the evaluation of patients with hematuria has diminished, and MDCT urography is now preferred to excretory urography in most cases.
MeSH:
Diagnostic Imaging; Hematuria; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Urography; Urologic Diseases
ISSN:
1546-3141

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Owen Jen
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Michael Men
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T12:05:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-05T12:05:12Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-
dc.identifier.citationImaging of hematuria. 2010, 195 (4):W263-7 AJR Am J Roentgenolen
dc.identifier.issn1546-3141-
dc.identifier.pmid20858787-
dc.identifier.doi10.2214/AJR.09.4181-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200236-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE: In this article, we will discuss the current status of imaging in patients with hematuria of urologic origin. Issues impacting evaluation of these patients with radiography, excretory urography, retrograde pyelography, and sonography will be discussed. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography has no role in the detection of renal or urothelial carcinoma. Low-dose CT offers much greater sensitivities for the detection of urinary tract calculi than radiography at doses equivalent to conventional radiography. Ultrasound alone is insufficient for imaging of hematuria. Using ultrasound alone, it is often difficult to differentiate renal transitional cell carcinoma from other causes of filling defects of the renal collecting system such as blood clots, sloughed papillae, or fungus balls. The prominence of the role of excretory urography in the evaluation of patients with hematuria has diminished, and MDCT urography is now preferred to excretory urography in most cases.en
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: In this article, we will discuss the current status of imaging in patients with hematuria of urologic origin. Issues impacting evaluation of these patients with radiography, excretory urography, retrograde pyelography, and sonography will be discussed. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography has no role in the detection of renal or urothelial carcinoma. Low-dose CT offers much greater sensitivities for the detection of urinary tract calculi than radiography at doses equivalent to conventional radiography. Ultrasound alone is insufficient for imaging of hematuria. Using ultrasound alone, it is often difficult to differentiate renal transitional cell carcinoma from other causes of filling defects of the renal collecting system such as blood clots, sloughed papillae, or fungus balls. The prominence of the role of excretory urography in the evaluation of patients with hematuria has diminished, and MDCT urography is now preferred to excretory urography in most cases.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ajronline.org/content/195/4/W263.full.pdf+htmlen
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Imaging-
dc.subject.meshHematuria-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed-
dc.subject.meshUrography-
dc.subject.meshUrologic Diseases-
dc.titleImaging of hematuria.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalAJR. American journal of roentgenologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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