"The challenge facing renal artery revascularization: what have we not proven and why we must"?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200077
Title:
"The challenge facing renal artery revascularization: what have we not proven and why we must"?
Authors:
Hynes, B G; Margey, R; Moran, D; Ruggiero, N J; Kiernan, T J; Jaff, M R
Affiliation:
Section of Vascular Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA, USA.
Citation:
"The challenge facing renal artery revascularization: what have we not proven and why we must"?, 110 (6):575-83 Acta Chir. Belg.
Journal:
Acta chirurgica Belgica
Issue Date:
4-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200077
PubMed ID:
21337836
Abstract:
Endovascular renal artery stent therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) is associated with excellent acute technical success, low complication rates and acceptable long-term patency. However, the clinical benefits to patients of renal artery stenting remain uncertain. To facilitate debate regarding the treatment of RAS, we need to understand the epidemiology, basic physiology and clinical consequences of renal artery stenosis. We must attempt to determine which patients are likely to benefit from renal artery stenting, assess the nuances of the percutaneous procedure and review the current literature pertaining to renal artery stenting.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Endovascular renal artery stent therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) is associated with excellent acute technical success, low complication rates and acceptable long-term patency. However, the clinical benefits to patients of renal artery stenting remain uncertain. To facilitate debate regarding the treatment of RAS, we need to understand the epidemiology, basic physiology and clinical consequences of renal artery stenosis. We must attempt to determine which patients are likely to benefit from renal artery stenting, assess the nuances of the percutaneous procedure and review the current literature pertaining to renal artery stenting.
MeSH:
Angioplasty, Balloon; Antibodies, Monoclonal; Atherosclerosis; Clinical Trials as Topic; Disease Progression; Humans; Hypertension; Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments; Patient Selection; Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Recurrence; Renal Artery Obstruction; Severity of Illness Index; Stents; Treatment Outcome; Vascular Patency
ISSN:
0001-5458

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHynes, B Gen
dc.contributor.authorMargey, Ren
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Den
dc.contributor.authorRuggiero, N Jen
dc.contributor.authorKiernan, T Jen
dc.contributor.authorJaff, M Ren
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-04T16:30:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-04T16:30:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04T16:30:02Z-
dc.identifier.citation"The challenge facing renal artery revascularization: what have we not proven and why we must"?, 110 (6):575-83 Acta Chir. Belg.en
dc.identifier.issn0001-5458-
dc.identifier.pmid21337836-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200077-
dc.descriptionEndovascular renal artery stent therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) is associated with excellent acute technical success, low complication rates and acceptable long-term patency. However, the clinical benefits to patients of renal artery stenting remain uncertain. To facilitate debate regarding the treatment of RAS, we need to understand the epidemiology, basic physiology and clinical consequences of renal artery stenosis. We must attempt to determine which patients are likely to benefit from renal artery stenting, assess the nuances of the percutaneous procedure and review the current literature pertaining to renal artery stenting.en
dc.description.abstractEndovascular renal artery stent therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) is associated with excellent acute technical success, low complication rates and acceptable long-term patency. However, the clinical benefits to patients of renal artery stenting remain uncertain. To facilitate debate regarding the treatment of RAS, we need to understand the epidemiology, basic physiology and clinical consequences of renal artery stenosis. We must attempt to determine which patients are likely to benefit from renal artery stenting, assess the nuances of the percutaneous procedure and review the current literature pertaining to renal artery stenting.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAngioplasty, Balloon-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal-
dc.subject.meshAtherosclerosis-
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topic-
dc.subject.meshDisease Progression-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypertension-
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Fab Fragments-
dc.subject.meshPatient Selection-
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex-
dc.subject.meshPractice Guidelines as Topic-
dc.subject.meshRecurrence-
dc.subject.meshRenal Artery Obstruction-
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Index-
dc.subject.meshStents-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.subject.meshVascular Patency-
dc.title"The challenge facing renal artery revascularization: what have we not proven and why we must"?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSection of Vascular Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalActa chirurgica Belgicaen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.