Epidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200036
Title:
Epidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children.
Authors:
Jennings, Aisling; Duggan, Eileen; Perry, Ivan J; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B
Affiliation:
Departments of Paediatrics and Child Health Epidemiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Epidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children. 2010, 21 (8):1166-70 Pediatr Allergy Immunol
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200036
DOI:
10.1111/j.1399-3038.2010.01054.x
PubMed ID:
20408970
Abstract:
The aim of this was to study generate the first epidemiological data regarding the prevalence of hymenoptera allergy among school children in Ireland. Questionnaires, including six sting-specific questions (1), were distributed to the parents of primary school children aged 6-8 and 11-13, divided equally between rural and urban backgrounds. From 110 schools, 4112 questionnaires were returned. A total of 1544 (37.5%) children had been stung in their lifetime. Among the total, 5.8% of children stung experienced a large local reaction, 3.4% had a mild (cutaneous) systemic reaction (MSR) and 0.8% experienced a moderate/severe systemic reaction (SSR); these figures respectively represent 2.2%, 1.3% and 0.2% of the total study group. On logistic regression analysis, older children and rural children were at a higher risk of being stung (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.4-2.; OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.4-1.8 respectively). Rural dwellers and asthma sufferers were more likely to experience an SSR (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.4-13.5 and OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.8-4.3, respectively). Hymenoptera stings are more common in rural than urban dwelling Irish children. Asthma imparted a greater risk of SSR in this study population. Severe reactions are unusual overall, occurring in <1% of those stung, a lower prevalence than in Israeli teenagers but in keeping with other European reports relating to young children.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Animals; Arthropod Venoms; Asthma; Child; Female; Humans; Hymenoptera; Hypersensitivity; Insect Bites and Stings; Ireland; Male; Population; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Rural Population
ISSN:
1399-3038

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJennings, Aislingen
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, Eileenen
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Ivan Jen
dc.contributor.authorHourihane, Jonathan O'Ben
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-04T15:43:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-04T15:43:46Z-
dc.date.issued2010-12-
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children. 2010, 21 (8):1166-70 Pediatr Allergy Immunolen
dc.identifier.issn1399-3038-
dc.identifier.pmid20408970-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1399-3038.2010.01054.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200036-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this was to study generate the first epidemiological data regarding the prevalence of hymenoptera allergy among school children in Ireland. Questionnaires, including six sting-specific questions (1), were distributed to the parents of primary school children aged 6-8 and 11-13, divided equally between rural and urban backgrounds. From 110 schools, 4112 questionnaires were returned. A total of 1544 (37.5%) children had been stung in their lifetime. Among the total, 5.8% of children stung experienced a large local reaction, 3.4% had a mild (cutaneous) systemic reaction (MSR) and 0.8% experienced a moderate/severe systemic reaction (SSR); these figures respectively represent 2.2%, 1.3% and 0.2% of the total study group. On logistic regression analysis, older children and rural children were at a higher risk of being stung (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.4-2.; OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.4-1.8 respectively). Rural dwellers and asthma sufferers were more likely to experience an SSR (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.4-13.5 and OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.8-4.3, respectively). Hymenoptera stings are more common in rural than urban dwelling Irish children. Asthma imparted a greater risk of SSR in this study population. Severe reactions are unusual overall, occurring in <1% of those stung, a lower prevalence than in Israeli teenagers but in keeping with other European reports relating to young children.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshArthropod Venoms-
dc.subject.meshAsthma-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHymenoptera-
dc.subject.meshHypersensitivity-
dc.subject.meshInsect Bites and Stings-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPopulation-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshRural Population-
dc.titleEpidemiology of allergic reactions to hymenoptera stings in Irish school children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartments of Paediatrics and Child Health Epidemiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalPediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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