The colonic microflora and probiotic therapy in health and disease.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200015
Title:
The colonic microflora and probiotic therapy in health and disease.
Authors:
Shanahan, Fergus
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. f.shanahan@ucc.ie
Citation:
The colonic microflora and probiotic therapy in health and disease. 2011, 27 (1):61-5 Curr. Opin. Gastroenterol.
Journal:
Current opinion in gastroenterology
Issue Date:
Jan-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/200015
DOI:
10.1097/MOG.0b013e328340076f
PubMed ID:
20885319
Abstract:
Host-microbe dialogue is involved not only in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis but also in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders of the gut. This has led to a resurgence of interest in the colonic microbiota in health and disease. Recent landmark findings are addressed here.; Reciprocal signalling between the immune system and the microbiota plays a pivotal role in linking alterations in gut microbiota with risk of metabolic disease in the host, notably insulin resistance, obesity, and chronic low-grade inflammation. Loss of ancestral indigenous organisms consequent upon a modern lifestyle may contribute to an increased frequency of various metabolic and immuno-allergic diseases. The potential to address this underpins the science of pharmabiotics.; Advances in understanding host-microbe interactions within the gut can inform rational probiotic or pharmabiotic selection criteria. In addition, the gut microbiota may be a repository for drug discovery as well as a therapeutic target.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Host-microbe dialogue is involved not only in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis but also in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders of the gut. This has led to a resurgence of interest in the colonic microbiota in health and disease. Recent landmark findings are addressed here. RECENT FINDINGS: Reciprocal signalling between the immune system and the microbiota plays a pivotal role in linking alterations in gut microbiota with risk of metabolic disease in the host, notably insulin resistance, obesity, and chronic low-grade inflammation. Loss of ancestral indigenous organisms consequent upon a modern lifestyle may contribute to an increased frequency of various metabolic and immuno-allergic diseases. The potential to address this underpins the science of pharmabiotics. SUMMARY: Advances in understanding host-microbe interactions within the gut can inform rational probiotic or pharmabiotic selection criteria. In addition, the gut microbiota may be a repository for drug discovery as well as a therapeutic target.
MeSH:
Colon; Colonic Diseases; Humans; Probiotics
ISSN:
1531-7056

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShanahan, Fergusen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-04T15:35:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-04T15:35:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-01-
dc.identifier.citationThe colonic microflora and probiotic therapy in health and disease. 2011, 27 (1):61-5 Curr. Opin. Gastroenterol.en
dc.identifier.issn1531-7056-
dc.identifier.pmid20885319-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MOG.0b013e328340076f-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/200015-
dc.descriptionPURPOSE OF REVIEW: Host-microbe dialogue is involved not only in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis but also in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders of the gut. This has led to a resurgence of interest in the colonic microbiota in health and disease. Recent landmark findings are addressed here. RECENT FINDINGS: Reciprocal signalling between the immune system and the microbiota plays a pivotal role in linking alterations in gut microbiota with risk of metabolic disease in the host, notably insulin resistance, obesity, and chronic low-grade inflammation. Loss of ancestral indigenous organisms consequent upon a modern lifestyle may contribute to an increased frequency of various metabolic and immuno-allergic diseases. The potential to address this underpins the science of pharmabiotics. SUMMARY: Advances in understanding host-microbe interactions within the gut can inform rational probiotic or pharmabiotic selection criteria. In addition, the gut microbiota may be a repository for drug discovery as well as a therapeutic target.en
dc.description.abstractHost-microbe dialogue is involved not only in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis but also in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders of the gut. This has led to a resurgence of interest in the colonic microbiota in health and disease. Recent landmark findings are addressed here.-
dc.description.abstractReciprocal signalling between the immune system and the microbiota plays a pivotal role in linking alterations in gut microbiota with risk of metabolic disease in the host, notably insulin resistance, obesity, and chronic low-grade inflammation. Loss of ancestral indigenous organisms consequent upon a modern lifestyle may contribute to an increased frequency of various metabolic and immuno-allergic diseases. The potential to address this underpins the science of pharmabiotics.-
dc.description.abstractAdvances in understanding host-microbe interactions within the gut can inform rational probiotic or pharmabiotic selection criteria. In addition, the gut microbiota may be a repository for drug discovery as well as a therapeutic target.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshColon-
dc.subject.meshColonic Diseases-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshProbiotics-
dc.titleThe colonic microflora and probiotic therapy in health and disease.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. f.shanahan@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalCurrent opinion in gastroenterologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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