Brachial neuritis masquerading as acute coronary syndrome.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/198781
Title:
Brachial neuritis masquerading as acute coronary syndrome.
Authors:
Dineen, J; Saidha, S; McNamara, B; Plant, B; Ryan, A M
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Centre, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Brachial neuritis masquerading as acute coronary syndrome. 2011, 180 (1):291-4 Ir J Med Sci
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/198781
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-010-0568-1
PubMed ID:
20838916
Abstract:
Brachial neuritis is a frequently misdiagnosed condition which can present to many medical or surgical specialties.; To report a case of brachial neuritis with bilateral phrenic nerve involvement and diaphragmatic weakness.; A 63-year-old man presented with acute-onset proximal upper extremity pain and weakness. He also developed severe orthopnoea. Examination revealed proximal upper limb wasting and dramatic paradoxical breathing. Cardiac investigations were unremarkable. Electromyographic studies were consistent with a C5 radiculopathy. Phrenic nerve studies were abnormal bilaterally and Sniff test was positive. A diagnosis of brachial neuritis with predominant C5 and bilateral phrenic nerve involvement was made. His symptoms resolved spontaneously over 3 months.; Brachial neuritis can mimic an acute coronary syndrome and is a rare cause of bilateral phrenic neuropathy. Phrenic nerve palsy should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath without any underlying respiratory or cardiovascular illness.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: Brachial neuritis is a frequently misdiagnosed condition which can present to many medical or surgical specialties. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of brachial neuritis with bilateral phrenic nerve involvement and diaphragmatic weakness. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 63-year-old man presented with acute-onset proximal upper extremity pain and weakness. He also developed severe orthopnoea. Examination revealed proximal upper limb wasting and dramatic paradoxical breathing. Cardiac investigations were unremarkable. Electromyographic studies were consistent with a C5 radiculopathy. Phrenic nerve studies were abnormal bilaterally and Sniff test was positive. A diagnosis of brachial neuritis with predominant C5 and bilateral phrenic nerve involvement was made. His symptoms resolved spontaneously over 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: Brachial neuritis can mimic an acute coronary syndrome and is a rare cause of bilateral phrenic neuropathy. Phrenic nerve palsy should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath without any underlying respiratory or cardiovascular illness.
MeSH:
Acute Coronary Syndrome; Brachial Plexus Neuritis; Diagnosis, Differential; Diaphragm; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Neural Conduction; Phrenic Nerve
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDineen, Jen
dc.contributor.authorSaidha, Sen
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Ben
dc.contributor.authorPlant, Ben
dc.contributor.authorRyan, A Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-22T16:37:25Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-22T16:37:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.identifier.citationBrachial neuritis masquerading as acute coronary syndrome. 2011, 180 (1):291-4 Ir J Med Scien
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid20838916-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-010-0568-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/198781-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Brachial neuritis is a frequently misdiagnosed condition which can present to many medical or surgical specialties. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of brachial neuritis with bilateral phrenic nerve involvement and diaphragmatic weakness. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 63-year-old man presented with acute-onset proximal upper extremity pain and weakness. He also developed severe orthopnoea. Examination revealed proximal upper limb wasting and dramatic paradoxical breathing. Cardiac investigations were unremarkable. Electromyographic studies were consistent with a C5 radiculopathy. Phrenic nerve studies were abnormal bilaterally and Sniff test was positive. A diagnosis of brachial neuritis with predominant C5 and bilateral phrenic nerve involvement was made. His symptoms resolved spontaneously over 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: Brachial neuritis can mimic an acute coronary syndrome and is a rare cause of bilateral phrenic neuropathy. Phrenic nerve palsy should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath without any underlying respiratory or cardiovascular illness.en
dc.description.abstractBrachial neuritis is a frequently misdiagnosed condition which can present to many medical or surgical specialties.-
dc.description.abstractTo report a case of brachial neuritis with bilateral phrenic nerve involvement and diaphragmatic weakness.-
dc.description.abstractA 63-year-old man presented with acute-onset proximal upper extremity pain and weakness. He also developed severe orthopnoea. Examination revealed proximal upper limb wasting and dramatic paradoxical breathing. Cardiac investigations were unremarkable. Electromyographic studies were consistent with a C5 radiculopathy. Phrenic nerve studies were abnormal bilaterally and Sniff test was positive. A diagnosis of brachial neuritis with predominant C5 and bilateral phrenic nerve involvement was made. His symptoms resolved spontaneously over 3 months.-
dc.description.abstractBrachial neuritis can mimic an acute coronary syndrome and is a rare cause of bilateral phrenic neuropathy. Phrenic nerve palsy should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath without any underlying respiratory or cardiovascular illness.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAcute Coronary Syndrome-
dc.subject.meshBrachial Plexus Neuritis-
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differential-
dc.subject.meshDiaphragm-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeural Conduction-
dc.subject.meshPhrenic Nerve-
dc.titleBrachial neuritis masquerading as acute coronary syndrome.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology, National Neuroscience Centre, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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