Subtrochanteric hip fractures treated with cerclage cables and long cephalomedullary nails: a review of 17 consecutive cases over 2 years.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/198771
Title:
Subtrochanteric hip fractures treated with cerclage cables and long cephalomedullary nails: a review of 17 consecutive cases over 2 years.
Authors:
Kennedy, Muiris T; Mitra, Aniruddha; Hierlihy, Timothy G; Harty, James A; Reidy, Declan; Dolan, Mark
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork City, Ireland. muiris_kennedy@yahoo.ie
Citation:
Subtrochanteric hip fractures treated with cerclage cables and long cephalomedullary nails: a review of 17 consecutive cases over 2 years. 2011, 42 (11):1317-21 Injury
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Injury
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/198771
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2011.03.023
PubMed ID:
21497812
Abstract:
The conflict between the anatomist and biologist surgeons is exemplified by the debate about subtrochanteric hip fractures. Closed intramedullary nailing is biologically friendly but may result in prolonged procedures and malunion. By contrast, accurate anatomical open reduction may disturb the biological composition of the fracture environment.; There were 17 patients at our institution over a 2-year period whose long oblique subtrochanteric fractures would not reduce perfectly in an anatomical fashion using closed methods. All these patients had their fractures treated identically using a new policy at our unit. This strategy involved reduction of the fracture through an open approach, and then employing cerclage cables to stabilise the fracture in an anatomical position before finally inserting a cephalomedullary nail. These patients were retrospectively reviewed at an average of 18 months postoperatively, to assess their progressive functional and radiological outcome up to that point.; One patient had nonunion and required a secondary procedure. One patient died 8 days postoperatively from a medical complication. The remaining 15 healed within 6 months and all returned to independent living.; The results demonstrate that judicious use of cerclage cables to augment fixation of subtrochanteric femur fractures does not have a deleterious effect on healing. One should endeavour, however, to minimise the number of cables used. The basic science literature underpinning our approach to these unstable fractures is also discussed.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1879-0267

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Muiris Ten
dc.contributor.authorMitra, Aniruddhaen
dc.contributor.authorHierlihy, Timothy Gen
dc.contributor.authorHarty, James Aen
dc.contributor.authorReidy, Declanen
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-22T15:54:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-22T15:54:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationSubtrochanteric hip fractures treated with cerclage cables and long cephalomedullary nails: a review of 17 consecutive cases over 2 years. 2011, 42 (11):1317-21 Injuryen
dc.identifier.issn1879-0267-
dc.identifier.pmid21497812-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.injury.2011.03.023-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/198771-
dc.description.abstractThe conflict between the anatomist and biologist surgeons is exemplified by the debate about subtrochanteric hip fractures. Closed intramedullary nailing is biologically friendly but may result in prolonged procedures and malunion. By contrast, accurate anatomical open reduction may disturb the biological composition of the fracture environment.-
dc.description.abstractThere were 17 patients at our institution over a 2-year period whose long oblique subtrochanteric fractures would not reduce perfectly in an anatomical fashion using closed methods. All these patients had their fractures treated identically using a new policy at our unit. This strategy involved reduction of the fracture through an open approach, and then employing cerclage cables to stabilise the fracture in an anatomical position before finally inserting a cephalomedullary nail. These patients were retrospectively reviewed at an average of 18 months postoperatively, to assess their progressive functional and radiological outcome up to that point.-
dc.description.abstractOne patient had nonunion and required a secondary procedure. One patient died 8 days postoperatively from a medical complication. The remaining 15 healed within 6 months and all returned to independent living.-
dc.description.abstractThe results demonstrate that judicious use of cerclage cables to augment fixation of subtrochanteric femur fractures does not have a deleterious effect on healing. One should endeavour, however, to minimise the number of cables used. The basic science literature underpinning our approach to these unstable fractures is also discussed.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.titleSubtrochanteric hip fractures treated with cerclage cables and long cephalomedullary nails: a review of 17 consecutive cases over 2 years.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork City, Ireland. muiris_kennedy@yahoo.ieen
dc.identifier.journalInjuryen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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