Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/198719
Title:
Contact sport and osteoarthritis.
Authors:
Molloy, Michael G; Molloy, Catherine B
Affiliation:
Department of Rheumatology and Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. mgmmolloy@eircom.net
Citation:
Contact sport and osteoarthritis. 2011, 45 (4):275-7 Br J Sports Med
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Journal:
British journal of sports medicine
Issue Date:
Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/198719
DOI:
10.1136/bjsm.2011.083956
PubMed ID:
21444375
Abstract:
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease in the world and the single largest cause of disability for those over 18 years. It affects more than twice as many people as does cardiac disease, and increases in incidence and prevalence with age. Animal and human studies have shown no evidence of increased risk of hip or knee OA with moderate exercise and in the absence of traumatic injury, sporting activity has a protective effect. One age-matched case control study found recreational runners who ran 12-14 miles per week for up to 40 years had no increase in radiological or symptomatic hip or knee OA. However, higher rates of hip OA occur in contact sports than in age-matched controls, with the highest rate in professional players. Soccer players with torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are more likely to develop knee OA than those with intact ACL. Early ACL repair reduces the risk of knee OA, but does not prevent it. Established injury prevention programmes have been refined to prevent injuries such as ACL rupture.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease in the world and the single largest cause of disability for those over 18 years. It affects more than twice as many people as does cardiac disease, and increases in incidence and prevalence with age. Animal and human studies have shown no evidence of increased risk of hip or knee OA with moderate exercise and in the absence of traumatic injury, sporting activity has a protective effect. One age-matched case control study found recreational runners who ran 12-14 miles per week for up to 40 years had no increase in radiological or symptomatic hip or knee OA. However, higher rates of hip OA occur in contact sports than in age-matched controls, with the highest rate in professional players. Soccer players with torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are more likely to develop knee OA than those with intact ACL. Early ACL repair reduces the risk of knee OA, but does not prevent it. Established injury prevention programmes have been refined to prevent injuries such as ACL rupture.
ISSN:
1473-0480

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Michael Gen
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Catherine Ben
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-22T15:08:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-22T15:08:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-
dc.identifier.citationContact sport and osteoarthritis. 2011, 45 (4):275-7 Br J Sports Meden
dc.identifier.issn1473-0480-
dc.identifier.pmid21444375-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsm.2011.083956-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/198719-
dc.descriptionOsteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease in the world and the single largest cause of disability for those over 18 years. It affects more than twice as many people as does cardiac disease, and increases in incidence and prevalence with age. Animal and human studies have shown no evidence of increased risk of hip or knee OA with moderate exercise and in the absence of traumatic injury, sporting activity has a protective effect. One age-matched case control study found recreational runners who ran 12-14 miles per week for up to 40 years had no increase in radiological or symptomatic hip or knee OA. However, higher rates of hip OA occur in contact sports than in age-matched controls, with the highest rate in professional players. Soccer players with torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are more likely to develop knee OA than those with intact ACL. Early ACL repair reduces the risk of knee OA, but does not prevent it. Established injury prevention programmes have been refined to prevent injuries such as ACL rupture.en
dc.description.abstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease in the world and the single largest cause of disability for those over 18 years. It affects more than twice as many people as does cardiac disease, and increases in incidence and prevalence with age. Animal and human studies have shown no evidence of increased risk of hip or knee OA with moderate exercise and in the absence of traumatic injury, sporting activity has a protective effect. One age-matched case control study found recreational runners who ran 12-14 miles per week for up to 40 years had no increase in radiological or symptomatic hip or knee OA. However, higher rates of hip OA occur in contact sports than in age-matched controls, with the highest rate in professional players. Soccer players with torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are more likely to develop knee OA than those with intact ACL. Early ACL repair reduces the risk of knee OA, but does not prevent it. Established injury prevention programmes have been refined to prevent injuries such as ACL rupture.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltden
dc.titleContact sport and osteoarthritis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Rheumatology and Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. mgmmolloy@eircom.neten
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of sports medicineen
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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