Nurse burnout and the working environment.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/197878
Title:
Nurse burnout and the working environment.
Authors:
O'Mahony, Nuria
Affiliation:
Emergency Department, Cork University Hospital, Ireland.
Citation:
Nurse burnout and the working environment. 2011, 19 (5):30-7 Emerg Nurse
Journal:
Emergency nurse : the journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
Issue Date:
Sep-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/197878
PubMed ID:
21977687
Abstract:
This article examines levels of burnout experienced by emergency nurses and the characteristics of their work environment to determine if there is a relationship between the two.; A literature review of recent articles on emergency nurses' burnout and contributing factors was undertaken. A quantitative study, in which nurses were asked to indicate the extent of their agreement with a series of statements on burnout and the working environment, was then undertaken, and the results were analysed to ascertain the extent to which the two topic are related.; The results indicate that 52 per cent of nurses in an emergency department in Ireland experience high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, which are significantly related to the nature of their work environment.; Improvements to the environment and to education are required to reduce the risk of nurses developing burnout in the future.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
AIM: This article examines levels of burnout experienced by emergency nurses and the characteristics of their work environment to determine if there is a relationship between the two. METHOD: A literature review of recent articles on emergency nurses' burnout and contributing factors was undertaken. A quantitative study, in which nurses were asked to indicate the extent of their agreement with a series of statements on burnout and the working environment, was then undertaken, and the results were analysed to ascertain the extent to which the two topic are related. FINDING: The results indicate that 52 per cent of nurses in an emergency department in Ireland experience high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, which are significantly related to the nature of their work environment. CONCLUSION: Improvements to the environment and to education are required to reduce the risk of nurses developing burnout in the future.
MeSH:
Adult; Burnout, Professional; Emergency Nursing; Female; Great Britain; Greece; Humans; Ireland; Male; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Personnel Administration, Hospital; Physician-Nurse Relations; Quality of Health Care; Risk Factors; Workplace
ISSN:
1354-5752

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Nuriaen
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-19T16:34:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-19T16:34:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-09-
dc.identifier.citationNurse burnout and the working environment. 2011, 19 (5):30-7 Emerg Nurseen
dc.identifier.issn1354-5752-
dc.identifier.pmid21977687-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/197878-
dc.descriptionAIM: This article examines levels of burnout experienced by emergency nurses and the characteristics of their work environment to determine if there is a relationship between the two. METHOD: A literature review of recent articles on emergency nurses' burnout and contributing factors was undertaken. A quantitative study, in which nurses were asked to indicate the extent of their agreement with a series of statements on burnout and the working environment, was then undertaken, and the results were analysed to ascertain the extent to which the two topic are related. FINDING: The results indicate that 52 per cent of nurses in an emergency department in Ireland experience high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, which are significantly related to the nature of their work environment. CONCLUSION: Improvements to the environment and to education are required to reduce the risk of nurses developing burnout in the future.en
dc.description.abstractThis article examines levels of burnout experienced by emergency nurses and the characteristics of their work environment to determine if there is a relationship between the two.-
dc.description.abstractA literature review of recent articles on emergency nurses' burnout and contributing factors was undertaken. A quantitative study, in which nurses were asked to indicate the extent of their agreement with a series of statements on burnout and the working environment, was then undertaken, and the results were analysed to ascertain the extent to which the two topic are related.-
dc.description.abstractThe results indicate that 52 per cent of nurses in an emergency department in Ireland experience high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, which are significantly related to the nature of their work environment.-
dc.description.abstractImprovements to the environment and to education are required to reduce the risk of nurses developing burnout in the future.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBurnout, Professional-
dc.subject.meshEmergency Nursing-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshGreece-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshPersonnel Administration, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshPhysician-Nurse Relations-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Health Care-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshWorkplace-
dc.titleNurse burnout and the working environment.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Department, Cork University Hospital, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalEmergency nurse : the journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Associationen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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