Older people--recipients but also providers of informal care: an analysis among community samples in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/197873
Title:
Older people--recipients but also providers of informal care: an analysis among community samples in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
Authors:
McGee, Hannah M; Molloy, Gerard; O'Hanlon, Ann; Layte, Richard; Hickey, Anne
Affiliation:
Division of Population Health Sciences, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. hmcgee@rcsi.ie
Citation:
Older people--recipients but also providers of informal care: an analysis among community samples in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. 2008, 16 (5):548-53 Health Soc Care Community
Journal:
Health & social care in the community
Issue Date:
Sep-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/197873
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2524.2008.00806.x
PubMed ID:
18808512
Abstract:
Data on both the provision and receipt of informal care among populations of older adults are limited. Patterns of both informal care provided and received by older adults in the Republic of Ireland (RoI) and Northern Ireland (NI) were evaluated. A cross-sectional community-based population survey was conducted. Randomly selected older people (aged 65+, n = 2033, mean age (standard deviation): 74.1 years (6.8), 43% men, 68% response rate) provided information on the provision and receipt of care, its location, and the person(s) who provided the care. Twelve per cent of the sample (251/2033) identified themselves as informal caregivers (8% RoI and 17% NI). Caregivers were more likely to be women, married, have less education and have less functional impairment. Forty-nine per cent (1033/2033, 49% RoI and 48% NI) reported receiving some form of care in the past year. Care recipients were more likely to be older, married, have more functional impairment, and poorer self-rated health. Receiving regular informal care (help at least once a week) from a non-resident relative was the most common form of help received [28% overall (578/2033); 27% RoI and 30% NI]. Five per cent (n = 102/2033) of the sample reported both providing and receiving informal care. Levels of informal care provided by community-dwelling older adults were notably higher than reported in single-item national census questions. The balance of formal and informal health and social care will become increasingly important as populations age. It is essential, therefore, to evaluate factors facilitating or impeding informal care delivery.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Activities of Daily Living; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Caregivers; Censuses; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression; Family Characteristics; Female; Health Care Surveys; Health Status; Home Nursing; Humans; Ireland; Male; Marital Status; Northern Ireland; Population Dynamics; Residence Characteristics; Self Concept; Social Class
ISSN:
1365-2524

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcGee, Hannah Men
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Gerarden
dc.contributor.authorO'Hanlon, Annen
dc.contributor.authorLayte, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Anneen
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-19T16:13:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-19T16:13:22Z-
dc.date.issued2008-09-
dc.identifier.citationOlder people--recipients but also providers of informal care: an analysis among community samples in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. 2008, 16 (5):548-53 Health Soc Care Communityen
dc.identifier.issn1365-2524-
dc.identifier.pmid18808512-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2524.2008.00806.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/197873-
dc.description.abstractData on both the provision and receipt of informal care among populations of older adults are limited. Patterns of both informal care provided and received by older adults in the Republic of Ireland (RoI) and Northern Ireland (NI) were evaluated. A cross-sectional community-based population survey was conducted. Randomly selected older people (aged 65+, n = 2033, mean age (standard deviation): 74.1 years (6.8), 43% men, 68% response rate) provided information on the provision and receipt of care, its location, and the person(s) who provided the care. Twelve per cent of the sample (251/2033) identified themselves as informal caregivers (8% RoI and 17% NI). Caregivers were more likely to be women, married, have less education and have less functional impairment. Forty-nine per cent (1033/2033, 49% RoI and 48% NI) reported receiving some form of care in the past year. Care recipients were more likely to be older, married, have more functional impairment, and poorer self-rated health. Receiving regular informal care (help at least once a week) from a non-resident relative was the most common form of help received [28% overall (578/2033); 27% RoI and 30% NI]. Five per cent (n = 102/2033) of the sample reported both providing and receiving informal care. Levels of informal care provided by community-dwelling older adults were notably higher than reported in single-item national census questions. The balance of formal and informal health and social care will become increasingly important as populations age. It is essential, therefore, to evaluate factors facilitating or impeding informal care delivery.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshActivities of Daily Living-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshCaregivers-
dc.subject.meshCensuses-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshDepression-
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveys-
dc.subject.meshHealth Status-
dc.subject.meshHome Nursing-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMarital Status-
dc.subject.meshNorthern Ireland-
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamics-
dc.subject.meshResidence Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshSelf Concept-
dc.subject.meshSocial Class-
dc.titleOlder people--recipients but also providers of informal care: an analysis among community samples in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.en
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Population Health Sciences, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. hmcgee@rcsi.ieen
dc.identifier.journalHealth & social care in the communityen

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