Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189979
Title:
Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Authors:
Carmody, David; Doyle, Aoife; Firth, Richard G R; Byrne, Maria M; Daly, Sean; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Micheal; Coulter-Smith, Samuel; Kinsley, Brendan T
Affiliation:
Dublin Diabetes in Pregnancy Service, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, National Maternity Hospital, Coombe Women's Hospital and Rotunda Hospitals, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus. 2010, 11 (2):111-5 Pediatr Diabetes
Journal:
Pediatric diabetes
Issue Date:
Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189979
DOI:
10.1111/j.1399-5448.2009.00537.x
PubMed ID:
19968816
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1399-5448.2009.00537.x/abstract
Abstract:
Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.
MeSH:
Abortion, Spontaneous; Adolescent; Blood Glucose; Congenital Abnormalities; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1; Female; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; Humans; Insulin Resistance; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Pregnancy in Adolescence; Pregnancy in Diabetics; Pregnancy, High-Risk; Prenatal Care
ISSN:
1399-5448

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarmody, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Aoifeen
dc.contributor.authorFirth, Richard G Ren
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Maria Men
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Seanen
dc.contributor.authorMc Auliffe, Fionnualaen
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Michealen
dc.contributor.authorCoulter-Smith, Samuelen
dc.contributor.authorKinsley, Brendan Ten
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-18T15:26:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-18T15:26:29Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.citationTeenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus. 2010, 11 (2):111-5 Pediatr Diabetesen
dc.identifier.issn1399-5448-
dc.identifier.pmid19968816-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1399-5448.2009.00537.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/189979-
dc.descriptionYounger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.en
dc.description.abstractYounger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1399-5448.2009.00537.x/abstracten
dc.subject.meshAbortion, Spontaneous-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose-
dc.subject.meshCongenital Abnormalities-
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHemoglobin A, Glycosylated-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy in Adolescence-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy in Diabetics-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy, High-Risk-
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Care-
dc.titleTeenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDublin Diabetes in Pregnancy Service, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, National Maternity Hospital, Coombe Women's Hospital and Rotunda Hospitals, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalPediatric diabetesen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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