Thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies in early pregnancy and preterm delivery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189978
Title:
Thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies in early pregnancy and preterm delivery.
Authors:
Haddow, James E; Cleary-Goldman, Jane; McClain, Monica R; Palomaki, Glenn E; Neveux, Louis M; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Canick, Jacob A; Malone, Fergal D; Porter, T Flint; Nyberg, David A; Bernstein, Peter S; D'Alton, Mary E
Affiliation:
Women and Infants Hospital and Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. jhaddow@ipmms.org
Citation:
Thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies in early pregnancy and preterm delivery. 2010, 116 (1):58-62 Obstet Gynecol
Journal:
Obstetrics and gynecology
Issue Date:
Jul-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189978
DOI:
10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181e10b30
PubMed ID:
20567168
Abstract:
To further evaluate the relationship between thyroid antibodies and preterm births.; This is a prospective study of pregnancy outcome and demographic data combined with retrospective measurement of thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies. Sera were obtained at 11-13 and 15-18 weeks of gestation from 10,062 women with singleton viable pregnancies (a subset from the First- and Second-Trimester Risk of Aneuploidy [FaSTER] trial).; Women with elevated levels of thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin antibodies, or both in the first trimester have a higher rate of preterm delivery before 37 weeks of gestation than antibody-negative women (7.5% compared with 6.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.46). This is also the case for very preterm delivery before 32 weeks of gestation (1.2% compared with 0.7%, OR 1.70; 95% CI 0.98-2.94). Preterm premature rupture of membranes is also increased (2.0% compared with 1.2%, OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.05-2.44). These associations are less strong for second-trimester antibody measurements.; The present data do not confirm strong associations between thyroid antibody elevations and preterm birth found in three of five previously published reports. Preterm premature rupture of membranes appears to contribute to the thyroid antibody-associated early deliveries, possibly as a result of inflammation.; II.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE: To further evaluate the relationship between thyroid antibodies and preterm births. METHODS: This is a prospective study of pregnancy outcome and demographic data combined with retrospective measurement of thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies. Sera were obtained at 11-13 and 15-18 weeks of gestation from 10,062 women with singleton viable pregnancies (a subset from the First- and Second-Trimester Risk of Aneuploidy [FaSTER] trial). RESULTS: Women with elevated levels of thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin antibodies, or both in the first trimester have a higher rate of preterm delivery before 37 weeks of gestation than antibody-negative women (7.5% compared with 6.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.46). This is also the case for very preterm delivery before 32 weeks of gestation (1.2% compared with 0.7%, OR 1.70; 95% CI 0.98-2.94). Preterm premature rupture of membranes is also increased (2.0% compared with 1.2%, OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.05-2.44). These associations are less strong for second-trimester antibody measurements. CONCLUSION: The present data do not confirm strong associations between thyroid antibody elevations and preterm birth found in three of five previously published reports. Preterm premature rupture of membranes appears to contribute to the thyroid antibody-associated early deliveries, possibly as a result of inflammation.
MeSH:
Adult; Autoantibodies; Female; Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture; Humans; Iodide Peroxidase; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Trimester, First; Premature Birth; Prospective Studies; Retrospective Studies
ISSN:
1873-233X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaddow, James Een
dc.contributor.authorCleary-Goldman, Janeen
dc.contributor.authorMcClain, Monica Ren
dc.contributor.authorPalomaki, Glenn Een
dc.contributor.authorNeveux, Louis Men
dc.contributor.authorLambert-Messerlian, Geralynen
dc.contributor.authorCanick, Jacob Aen
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Fergal Den
dc.contributor.authorPorter, T Flinten
dc.contributor.authorNyberg, David Aen
dc.contributor.authorBernstein, Peter Sen
dc.contributor.authorD'Alton, Mary Een
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-18T15:25:23Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-18T15:25:23Z-
dc.date.issued2010-07-
dc.identifier.citationThyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies in early pregnancy and preterm delivery. 2010, 116 (1):58-62 Obstet Gynecolen
dc.identifier.issn1873-233X-
dc.identifier.pmid20567168-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181e10b30-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/189978-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE: To further evaluate the relationship between thyroid antibodies and preterm births. METHODS: This is a prospective study of pregnancy outcome and demographic data combined with retrospective measurement of thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies. Sera were obtained at 11-13 and 15-18 weeks of gestation from 10,062 women with singleton viable pregnancies (a subset from the First- and Second-Trimester Risk of Aneuploidy [FaSTER] trial). RESULTS: Women with elevated levels of thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin antibodies, or both in the first trimester have a higher rate of preterm delivery before 37 weeks of gestation than antibody-negative women (7.5% compared with 6.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.46). This is also the case for very preterm delivery before 32 weeks of gestation (1.2% compared with 0.7%, OR 1.70; 95% CI 0.98-2.94). Preterm premature rupture of membranes is also increased (2.0% compared with 1.2%, OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.05-2.44). These associations are less strong for second-trimester antibody measurements. CONCLUSION: The present data do not confirm strong associations between thyroid antibody elevations and preterm birth found in three of five previously published reports. Preterm premature rupture of membranes appears to contribute to the thyroid antibody-associated early deliveries, possibly as a result of inflammation.en
dc.description.abstractTo further evaluate the relationship between thyroid antibodies and preterm births.-
dc.description.abstractThis is a prospective study of pregnancy outcome and demographic data combined with retrospective measurement of thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies. Sera were obtained at 11-13 and 15-18 weeks of gestation from 10,062 women with singleton viable pregnancies (a subset from the First- and Second-Trimester Risk of Aneuploidy [FaSTER] trial).-
dc.description.abstractWomen with elevated levels of thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin antibodies, or both in the first trimester have a higher rate of preterm delivery before 37 weeks of gestation than antibody-negative women (7.5% compared with 6.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.46). This is also the case for very preterm delivery before 32 weeks of gestation (1.2% compared with 0.7%, OR 1.70; 95% CI 0.98-2.94). Preterm premature rupture of membranes is also increased (2.0% compared with 1.2%, OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.05-2.44). These associations are less strong for second-trimester antibody measurements.-
dc.description.abstractThe present data do not confirm strong associations between thyroid antibody elevations and preterm birth found in three of five previously published reports. Preterm premature rupture of membranes appears to contribute to the thyroid antibody-associated early deliveries, possibly as a result of inflammation.-
dc.description.abstractII.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAutoantibodies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFetal Membranes, Premature Rupture-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIodide Peroxidase-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, First-
dc.subject.meshPremature Birth-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.titleThyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies in early pregnancy and preterm delivery.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWomen and Infants Hospital and Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. jhaddow@ipmms.orgen
dc.identifier.journalObstetrics and gynecologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.