Self-reported post-discharge symptoms following obstetric neuraxial blockade.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189971
Title:
Self-reported post-discharge symptoms following obstetric neuraxial blockade.
Authors:
Hayes, N E; Wheelahan, J M; Ross, A
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia, Mercy Hospital for Women, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia. nihayes@rotunda.ie
Citation:
Self-reported post-discharge symptoms following obstetric neuraxial blockade. 2010, 19 (4):405-9 Int J Obstet Anesth
Journal:
International journal of obstetric anesthesia
Issue Date:
Oct-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189971
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijoa.2010.04.004
PubMed ID:
20702083
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959289X1000052X
Abstract:
Economic pressures are leading to earlier hospital discharge following delivery, before complications of obstetric neuraxial block may become apparent. Our aim was to estimate the incidence of symptoms presenting post-discharge at a single tertiary obstetric centre.; From June 2004 to June 2007, a prospective observational study of all women receiving neuraxial block for labour and delivery in our hospital was conducted. Patients were reviewed in hospital by the acute pain team and provided with a discharge advice form to take home to identify potential block-related complications. We collected data on those contacting us with new-onset symptoms after hospital discharge.; Ninety-eight patients (1.4%) made contact post-discharge following neuraxial block. The time range overall for presentation of symptoms was 2-260 days, with headache reported significantly earlier than backache. Many symptoms were self-limiting. Headache was the commonest primary complaint in 43 patients (44%) with four receiving an epidural blood patch. Sensorimotor symptoms of pain, paraesthesia or weakness was the primary complaint in 33 patients (34%), and backache in 21 (21%). Sixteen percent of patients with headache, 24% with sensorimotor symptoms and 14% with backache were referred to neurologists. There was a late self-report of obstetric palsy (1:15,033).; New post-discharge symptoms were self-reported by 1.4% of patients following neuraxial blockade. These were not detected during hospital stay despite routine directed post-block review. Only 4% of these symptoms could be directly attributable to neuraxial block.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: Economic pressures are leading to earlier hospital discharge following delivery, before complications of obstetric neuraxial block may become apparent. Our aim was to estimate the incidence of symptoms presenting post-discharge at a single tertiary obstetric centre. METHODS: From June 2004 to June 2007, a prospective observational study of all women receiving neuraxial block for labour and delivery in our hospital was conducted. Patients were reviewed in hospital by the acute pain team and provided with a discharge advice form to take home to identify potential block-related complications. We collected data on those contacting us with new-onset symptoms after hospital discharge. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients (1.4%) made contact post-discharge following neuraxial block. The time range overall for presentation of symptoms was 2-260 days, with headache reported significantly earlier than backache. Many symptoms were self-limiting. Headache was the commonest primary complaint in 43 patients (44%) with four receiving an epidural blood patch. Sensorimotor symptoms of pain, paraesthesia or weakness was the primary complaint in 33 patients (34%), and backache in 21 (21%). Sixteen percent of patients with headache, 24% with sensorimotor symptoms and 14% with backache were referred to neurologists. There was a late self-report of obstetric palsy (1:15,033). CONCLUSIONS: New post-discharge symptoms were self-reported by 1.4% of patients following neuraxial blockade. These were not detected during hospital stay despite routine directed post-block review. Only 4% of these symptoms could be directly attributable to neuraxial block.
MeSH:
Adult; Analgesia, Obstetrical; Anesthesia, Obstetrical; Back Pain; Blood Patch, Epidural; Female; Fever; Humans; Muscle Weakness; Nerve Block; Pain, Postoperative; Paresthesia; Post-Dural Puncture Headache; Postoperative Complications; Pregnancy; Prospective Studies; Sensation Disorders
ISSN:
1532-3374

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHayes, N Een
dc.contributor.authorWheelahan, J Men
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Aen
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-18T14:43:33Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-18T14:43:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-
dc.identifier.citationSelf-reported post-discharge symptoms following obstetric neuraxial blockade. 2010, 19 (4):405-9 Int J Obstet Anesthen
dc.identifier.issn1532-3374-
dc.identifier.pmid20702083-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijoa.2010.04.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/189971-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Economic pressures are leading to earlier hospital discharge following delivery, before complications of obstetric neuraxial block may become apparent. Our aim was to estimate the incidence of symptoms presenting post-discharge at a single tertiary obstetric centre. METHODS: From June 2004 to June 2007, a prospective observational study of all women receiving neuraxial block for labour and delivery in our hospital was conducted. Patients were reviewed in hospital by the acute pain team and provided with a discharge advice form to take home to identify potential block-related complications. We collected data on those contacting us with new-onset symptoms after hospital discharge. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients (1.4%) made contact post-discharge following neuraxial block. The time range overall for presentation of symptoms was 2-260 days, with headache reported significantly earlier than backache. Many symptoms were self-limiting. Headache was the commonest primary complaint in 43 patients (44%) with four receiving an epidural blood patch. Sensorimotor symptoms of pain, paraesthesia or weakness was the primary complaint in 33 patients (34%), and backache in 21 (21%). Sixteen percent of patients with headache, 24% with sensorimotor symptoms and 14% with backache were referred to neurologists. There was a late self-report of obstetric palsy (1:15,033). CONCLUSIONS: New post-discharge symptoms were self-reported by 1.4% of patients following neuraxial blockade. These were not detected during hospital stay despite routine directed post-block review. Only 4% of these symptoms could be directly attributable to neuraxial block.en
dc.description.abstractEconomic pressures are leading to earlier hospital discharge following delivery, before complications of obstetric neuraxial block may become apparent. Our aim was to estimate the incidence of symptoms presenting post-discharge at a single tertiary obstetric centre.-
dc.description.abstractFrom June 2004 to June 2007, a prospective observational study of all women receiving neuraxial block for labour and delivery in our hospital was conducted. Patients were reviewed in hospital by the acute pain team and provided with a discharge advice form to take home to identify potential block-related complications. We collected data on those contacting us with new-onset symptoms after hospital discharge.-
dc.description.abstractNinety-eight patients (1.4%) made contact post-discharge following neuraxial block. The time range overall for presentation of symptoms was 2-260 days, with headache reported significantly earlier than backache. Many symptoms were self-limiting. Headache was the commonest primary complaint in 43 patients (44%) with four receiving an epidural blood patch. Sensorimotor symptoms of pain, paraesthesia or weakness was the primary complaint in 33 patients (34%), and backache in 21 (21%). Sixteen percent of patients with headache, 24% with sensorimotor symptoms and 14% with backache were referred to neurologists. There was a late self-report of obstetric palsy (1:15,033).-
dc.description.abstractNew post-discharge symptoms were self-reported by 1.4% of patients following neuraxial blockade. These were not detected during hospital stay despite routine directed post-block review. Only 4% of these symptoms could be directly attributable to neuraxial block.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959289X1000052Xen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnalgesia, Obstetrical-
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Obstetrical-
dc.subject.meshBack Pain-
dc.subject.meshBlood Patch, Epidural-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFever-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMuscle Weakness-
dc.subject.meshNerve Block-
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperative-
dc.subject.meshParesthesia-
dc.subject.meshPost-Dural Puncture Headache-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSensation Disorders-
dc.titleSelf-reported post-discharge symptoms following obstetric neuraxial blockade.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia, Mercy Hospital for Women, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia. nihayes@rotunda.ieen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of obstetric anesthesiaen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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