Neonatal outcomes and operative vaginal delivery versus cesarean delivery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189932
Title:
Neonatal outcomes and operative vaginal delivery versus cesarean delivery.
Authors:
Contag, Stephen A; Clifton, Rebecca G; Bloom, Steven L; Spong, Catherine Y; Varner, Michael W; Rouse, Dwight J; Ramin, Susan M; Caritis, Steve N; Peaceman, Alan M; Sorokin, Yoram; Sciscione, Anthony; Carpenter, Marshall W; Mercer, Brian M; Thorp, John M; Malone, Fergal D; Iams, Jay D
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA. scontag@lifebridgehealth.org
Citation:
Neonatal outcomes and operative vaginal delivery versus cesarean delivery. 2010, 27 (6):493-9 Am J Perinatol
Journal:
American journal of perinatology
Issue Date:
Jun-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/189932
DOI:
10.1055/s-0030-1247605
PubMed ID:
20099218
Additional Links:
https://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0030-1247605
Abstract:
We compared outcomes for neonates with forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized trial in laboring, low-risk, nulliparous women at >or=36 weeks' gestation. Neonatal outcomes after use of forceps, vacuum, and cesarean were compared among women in the second stage of labor at station +1 or below (thirds scale) for failure of descent or nonreassuring fetal status. Nine hundred ninety women were included in this analysis: 549 (55%) with an indication for delivery of failure of descent and 441 (45%) for a nonreassuring fetal status. Umbilical cord gases were available for 87% of neonates. We found no differences in the base excess (P = 0.35 and 0.78 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) or frequencies of pH below 7.0 (P = 0.73 and 0.34 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) among the three delivery methods. Birth outcomes and umbilical cord blood gas values were similar for those neonates with a forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. The occurrence of significant fetal acidemia was not different among the three delivery methods regardless of the indication.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
We compared outcomes for neonates with forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized trial in laboring, low-risk, nulliparous women at >or=36 weeks' gestation. Neonatal outcomes after use of forceps, vacuum, and cesarean were compared among women in the second stage of labor at station +1 or below (thirds scale) for failure of descent or nonreassuring fetal status. Nine hundred ninety women were included in this analysis: 549 (55%) with an indication for delivery of failure of descent and 441 (45%) for a nonreassuring fetal status. Umbilical cord gases were available for 87% of neonates. We found no differences in the base excess (P = 0.35 and 0.78 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) or frequencies of pH below 7.0 (P = 0.73 and 0.34 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) among the three delivery methods. Birth outcomes and umbilical cord blood gas values were similar for those neonates with a forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. The occurrence of significant fetal acidemia was not different among the three delivery methods regardless of the indication.
MeSH:
Cesarean Section; Female; Gestational Age; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Labor Stage, Second; Male; Obstetrical Forceps; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
ISSN:
1098-8785

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorContag, Stephen Aen
dc.contributor.authorClifton, Rebecca Gen
dc.contributor.authorBloom, Steven Len
dc.contributor.authorSpong, Catherine Yen
dc.contributor.authorVarner, Michael Wen
dc.contributor.authorRouse, Dwight Jen
dc.contributor.authorRamin, Susan Men
dc.contributor.authorCaritis, Steve Nen
dc.contributor.authorPeaceman, Alan Men
dc.contributor.authorSorokin, Yoramen
dc.contributor.authorSciscione, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Marshall Wen
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Brian Men
dc.contributor.authorThorp, John Men
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Fergal Den
dc.contributor.authorIams, Jay Den
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-18T11:54:42Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-18T11:54:42Z-
dc.date.issued2010-06-
dc.identifier.citationNeonatal outcomes and operative vaginal delivery versus cesarean delivery. 2010, 27 (6):493-9 Am J Perinatolen
dc.identifier.issn1098-8785-
dc.identifier.pmid20099218-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0030-1247605-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/189932-
dc.descriptionWe compared outcomes for neonates with forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized trial in laboring, low-risk, nulliparous women at >or=36 weeks' gestation. Neonatal outcomes after use of forceps, vacuum, and cesarean were compared among women in the second stage of labor at station +1 or below (thirds scale) for failure of descent or nonreassuring fetal status. Nine hundred ninety women were included in this analysis: 549 (55%) with an indication for delivery of failure of descent and 441 (45%) for a nonreassuring fetal status. Umbilical cord gases were available for 87% of neonates. We found no differences in the base excess (P = 0.35 and 0.78 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) or frequencies of pH below 7.0 (P = 0.73 and 0.34 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) among the three delivery methods. Birth outcomes and umbilical cord blood gas values were similar for those neonates with a forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. The occurrence of significant fetal acidemia was not different among the three delivery methods regardless of the indication.en
dc.description.abstractWe compared outcomes for neonates with forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized trial in laboring, low-risk, nulliparous women at >or=36 weeks' gestation. Neonatal outcomes after use of forceps, vacuum, and cesarean were compared among women in the second stage of labor at station +1 or below (thirds scale) for failure of descent or nonreassuring fetal status. Nine hundred ninety women were included in this analysis: 549 (55%) with an indication for delivery of failure of descent and 441 (45%) for a nonreassuring fetal status. Umbilical cord gases were available for 87% of neonates. We found no differences in the base excess (P = 0.35 and 0.78 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) or frequencies of pH below 7.0 (P = 0.73 and 0.34 for failure of descent and nonreassuring fetal status) among the three delivery methods. Birth outcomes and umbilical cord blood gas values were similar for those neonates with a forceps-assisted, vacuum-assisted, or cesarean delivery in the second stage of labor. The occurrence of significant fetal acidemia was not different among the three delivery methods regardless of the indication.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0030-1247605en
dc.subject.meshCesarean Section-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGestational Age-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshLabor Stage, Second-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshObstetrical Forceps-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshVacuum Extraction, Obstetrical-
dc.titleNeonatal outcomes and operative vaginal delivery versus cesarean delivery.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA. scontag@lifebridgehealth.orgen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican journal of perinatologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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