Alcohol screening and brief intervention among drug users in primary care: a discussion paper.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/145254
Title:
Alcohol screening and brief intervention among drug users in primary care: a discussion paper.
Authors:
Field, C A; Klimas, J; Barry, J; Bury, G; Keenan, E; Lyons, S; Smyth, B P; Cullen, W
Affiliation:
UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Healthcare Centre, Dolphins Barn, Dublin 8, Ireland.
Citation:
Alcohol screening and brief intervention among drug users in primary care: a discussion paper. 2011:notIr J Med Sci
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
24-Aug-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/145254
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-011-0748-7
PubMed ID:
21863331
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21863331
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Problem alcohol use is common among problem drug users (PDU) and associated with adverse health outcomes. Primary care has an important role in the overall stepped approach to alcohol treatment, especially screening and brief intervention (SBI). AIM: To discuss three themes that emerged from an exploration of the literature on SBI for problem alcohol use in drug users attending primary care. METHODS: Material for this discussion paper was gathered from three biomedical databases (PubMed, PsycINFO and Cochrane library), conference proceedings and online resources of professional organisations or national health agencies. RESULTS: Themes discussed in this paper are: (a) the potential of primary care for delivery of alcohol SBIs to PDUs, (b) screening methods and (c) application of brief interventions to PDUs. CONCLUSIONS: Although SBI improves health outcomes associated with problem alcohol use in the general population, further research is needed among high-risk patient groups, especially PDUs.
Item Type:
Article In Press
Description:
BACKGROUND: Problem alcohol use is common among problem drug users (PDU) and associated with adverse health outcomes. Primary care has an important role in the overall stepped approach to alcohol treatment, especially screening and brief intervention (SBI). AIM: To discuss three themes that emerged from an exploration of the literature on SBI for problem alcohol use in drug users attending primary care. METHODS: Material for this discussion paper was gathered from three biomedical databases (PubMed, PsycINFO and Cochrane library), conference proceedings and online resources of professional organisations or national health agencies. RESULTS: Themes discussed in this paper are: (a) the potential of primary care for delivery of alcohol SBIs to PDUs, (b) screening methods and (c) application of brief interventions to PDUs. CONCLUSIONS: Although SBI improves health outcomes associated with problem alcohol use in the general population, further research is needed among high-risk patient groups, especially PDUs.
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorField, C Aen
dc.contributor.authorKlimas, Jen
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Jen
dc.contributor.authorBury, Gen
dc.contributor.authorKeenan, Een
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Sen
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, B Pen
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Wen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-13T14:52:52Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-13T14:52:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-24-
dc.identifier.citationAlcohol screening and brief intervention among drug users in primary care: a discussion paper. 2011:notIr J Med Scien
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid21863331-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-011-0748-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/145254-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Problem alcohol use is common among problem drug users (PDU) and associated with adverse health outcomes. Primary care has an important role in the overall stepped approach to alcohol treatment, especially screening and brief intervention (SBI). AIM: To discuss three themes that emerged from an exploration of the literature on SBI for problem alcohol use in drug users attending primary care. METHODS: Material for this discussion paper was gathered from three biomedical databases (PubMed, PsycINFO and Cochrane library), conference proceedings and online resources of professional organisations or national health agencies. RESULTS: Themes discussed in this paper are: (a) the potential of primary care for delivery of alcohol SBIs to PDUs, (b) screening methods and (c) application of brief interventions to PDUs. CONCLUSIONS: Although SBI improves health outcomes associated with problem alcohol use in the general population, further research is needed among high-risk patient groups, especially PDUs.en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Problem alcohol use is common among problem drug users (PDU) and associated with adverse health outcomes. Primary care has an important role in the overall stepped approach to alcohol treatment, especially screening and brief intervention (SBI). AIM: To discuss three themes that emerged from an exploration of the literature on SBI for problem alcohol use in drug users attending primary care. METHODS: Material for this discussion paper was gathered from three biomedical databases (PubMed, PsycINFO and Cochrane library), conference proceedings and online resources of professional organisations or national health agencies. RESULTS: Themes discussed in this paper are: (a) the potential of primary care for delivery of alcohol SBIs to PDUs, (b) screening methods and (c) application of brief interventions to PDUs. CONCLUSIONS: Although SBI improves health outcomes associated with problem alcohol use in the general population, further research is needed among high-risk patient groups, especially PDUs.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21863331en
dc.titleAlcohol screening and brief intervention among drug users in primary care: a discussion paper.en
dc.typeArticle In Pressen
dc.contributor.departmentUCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Healthcare Centre, Dolphins Barn, Dublin 8, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.