Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/144300
Title:
Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007.
Authors:
Lucey, J M; Gavin, P; Cafferkey, M; Butler, K M
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Children's University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin 1, Ireland. Juliette.Lucey@health.wa.gov.au
Citation:
Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007. 2011, 180 (1):47-50 Ir J Med Sci
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/144300
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-010-0620-1
PubMed ID:
21072618
Abstract:
To document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007).; Subjects with pneumococcal meningitis were identified at The Children's University Hospital, Dublin through the hospital surveillance system and laboratory archives.; 44 children were identified with S. pneumoniae meningitis. Mean age of presentation was 23.45 months (2 days to 13 years) and 28 (65%) cases were less than 12 months old. Eight (18.6%) children died. 55% of cases were left with significant deficits. Of the survivors, 7 (20%) had moderate to severe neurological sequelae.; Pneumococcal meningitis is a devastating childhood disease with significant mortality and morbidity, especially in those less than 2 years of age. These data provide a baseline against which the impact of PCV7 on pneumococcal meningitis can be measured.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
AIM: To document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007). METHODS: Subjects with pneumococcal meningitis were identified at The Children's University Hospital, Dublin through the hospital surveillance system and laboratory archives. RESULTS: 44 children were identified with S. pneumoniae meningitis. Mean age of presentation was 23.45 months (2 days to 13 years) and 28 (65%) cases were less than 12 months old. Eight (18.6%) children died. 55% of cases were left with significant deficits. Of the survivors, 7 (20%) had moderate to severe neurological sequelae. CONCLUSION: Pneumococcal meningitis is a devastating childhood disease with significant mortality and morbidity, especially in those less than 2 years of age. These data provide a baseline against which the impact of PCV7 on pneumococcal meningitis can be measured.
MeSH:
Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Hospitals, Pediatric; Humans; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Ireland; Length of Stay; Male; Meningitis, Pneumococcal; Retrospective Studies; Serotyping
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLucey, J Men
dc.contributor.authorGavin, Pen
dc.contributor.authorCafferkey, Men
dc.contributor.authorButler, K Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-07T14:16:55Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-07T14:16:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.identifier.citationPneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007. 2011, 180 (1):47-50 Ir J Med Scien
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid21072618-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-010-0620-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/144300-
dc.descriptionAIM: To document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007). METHODS: Subjects with pneumococcal meningitis were identified at The Children's University Hospital, Dublin through the hospital surveillance system and laboratory archives. RESULTS: 44 children were identified with S. pneumoniae meningitis. Mean age of presentation was 23.45 months (2 days to 13 years) and 28 (65%) cases were less than 12 months old. Eight (18.6%) children died. 55% of cases were left with significant deficits. Of the survivors, 7 (20%) had moderate to severe neurological sequelae. CONCLUSION: Pneumococcal meningitis is a devastating childhood disease with significant mortality and morbidity, especially in those less than 2 years of age. These data provide a baseline against which the impact of PCV7 on pneumococcal meningitis can be measured.en
dc.description.abstractTo document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007).-
dc.description.abstractSubjects with pneumococcal meningitis were identified at The Children's University Hospital, Dublin through the hospital surveillance system and laboratory archives.-
dc.description.abstract44 children were identified with S. pneumoniae meningitis. Mean age of presentation was 23.45 months (2 days to 13 years) and 28 (65%) cases were less than 12 months old. Eight (18.6%) children died. 55% of cases were left with significant deficits. Of the survivors, 7 (20%) had moderate to severe neurological sequelae.-
dc.description.abstractPneumococcal meningitis is a devastating childhood disease with significant mortality and morbidity, especially in those less than 2 years of age. These data provide a baseline against which the impact of PCV7 on pneumococcal meningitis can be measured.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Pediatric-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMeningitis, Pneumococcal-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSerotyping-
dc.titlePneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Paediatrics, Children's University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin 1, Ireland. Juliette.Lucey@health.wa.gov.auen
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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