Thyroperoxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies in Early Pregnancy and Placental Abruption

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/144295
Title:
Thyroperoxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies in Early Pregnancy and Placental Abruption
Authors:
Haddow, James E.; McClain, Monica R.; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Neveux, Louis M.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Canick, Jacob A.; Malone, Fergal D.; Porter, T. Flint; Nyberg, David A.; Bernstein, Peter S.; DʼAlton, Mary E.
Citation:
Thyroperoxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies in Early Pregnancy and Placental Abruption 2011, 117 (2, Part 1):287 Obstetrics & Gynecology
Journal:
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/144295
DOI:
10.1097/AOG.0b013e31820513d9
Additional Links:
http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:landingpage&an=00006250-201102000-00013
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the relationship between thyroid antibodies and placental abruption. METHODS: This cohort study assesses thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies in relation to placental abruption among 10,062 women with singleton viable pregnancies (from the First and Second Trimester Risk of Aneuploidy [FaSTER] trial). A thyroperoxidase antibody cutoff of 50 international units/mL is used for comparison with published data from another cohort. RESULTS: Women with elevated thyroperoxidase antibody levels in the first and second trimesters have a higher rate of placental abruption than antibody-negative women. This relationship is less strong in the first trimester (1.51% compared with 0.83%; odds ratio [OR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99–3.37) than in the second trimester (1.78% compared with 0.82%; OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.21–3.99). A similar, but weaker, relationship is present for thyroglobulin antibodies. Sixty-four of 782 thyroperoxidase antibody-positive pregnancies without abruption become negative by the second trimester; one pregnancy with abruption becomes antibody-positive. Odds ratios for pregnancies with both thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibody elevations are also higher (first trimester: OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 0.91–4.86; second trimester: OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.17–6.33). CONCLUSION: The present data confirm an association between thyroid antibody elevations and placental abruption described in a recent report. These findings, however, do not provide support for recommending routine testing for thyroid antibodies during pregnancy.
ISSN:
0029-7844

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaddow, James E.en
dc.contributor.authorMcClain, Monica R.en
dc.contributor.authorPalomaki, Glenn E.en
dc.contributor.authorNeveux, Louis M.en
dc.contributor.authorLambert-Messerlian, Geralynen
dc.contributor.authorCanick, Jacob A.en
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Fergal D.en
dc.contributor.authorPorter, T. Flinten
dc.contributor.authorNyberg, David A.en
dc.contributor.authorBernstein, Peter S.en
dc.contributor.authorDʼAlton, Mary E.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-07T13:59:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-07T13:59:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationThyroperoxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies in Early Pregnancy and Placental Abruption 2011, 117 (2, Part 1):287 Obstetrics & Gynecologyen
dc.identifier.issn0029-7844-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/AOG.0b013e31820513d9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/144295-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE: To estimate the relationship between thyroid antibodies and placental abruption. METHODS: This cohort study assesses thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies in relation to placental abruption among 10,062 women with singleton viable pregnancies (from the First and Second Trimester Risk of Aneuploidy [FaSTER] trial). A thyroperoxidase antibody cutoff of 50 international units/mL is used for comparison with published data from another cohort. RESULTS: Women with elevated thyroperoxidase antibody levels in the first and second trimesters have a higher rate of placental abruption than antibody-negative women. This relationship is less strong in the first trimester (1.51% compared with 0.83%; odds ratio [OR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99–3.37) than in the second trimester (1.78% compared with 0.82%; OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.21–3.99). A similar, but weaker, relationship is present for thyroglobulin antibodies. Sixty-four of 782 thyroperoxidase antibody-positive pregnancies without abruption become negative by the second trimester; one pregnancy with abruption becomes antibody-positive. Odds ratios for pregnancies with both thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibody elevations are also higher (first trimester: OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 0.91–4.86; second trimester: OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.17–6.33). CONCLUSION: The present data confirm an association between thyroid antibody elevations and placental abruption described in a recent report. These findings, however, do not provide support for recommending routine testing for thyroid antibodies during pregnancy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:landingpage&an=00006250-201102000-00013en
dc.titleThyroperoxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies in Early Pregnancy and Placental Abruptionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalObstetrics & Gynecologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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