Hydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/144013
Title:
Hydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates.
Authors:
Martin, Fiachra T; O'Sullivan, John B; Regan, Padraic J; McCann, Jack; Kelly, Jack L
Affiliation:
Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. fiachra1978@yahoo.com
Citation:
Hydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates. 2010, 45 (3):600-5 J. Pediatr. Surg.
Journal:
Journal of pediatric surgery
Issue Date:
Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/144013
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2009.09.037
PubMed ID:
20223327
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022346809007787
Abstract:
Partial-thickness scalds are the most common pediatric burn injury, and primary management consists of wound dressings to optimize the environment for reepithelialization. Operative intervention is reserved for burns that fail to heal using conservative methods. Worldwide, paraffin-based gauze (Jelonet) is the most common burn dressing; but literature suggests that it adheres to wounds and requires more frequent dressing change that may traumatize newly epithelialized surfaces. Hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM) provide an occlusive moist environment to optimize healing and are associated with less frequent dressing changes.; The aim of the study was to retrospectively analyze pediatric burns in a single tertiary referral center over a 10-year period comparing the impact of Jelonet and DuoDERM dressings relative to operative intervention rates.; All pediatric burns admitted between 1997 and 2007 were identified using the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry system. Demographics were collected from hospital records and theater logbooks. Acute, partial-thickness burns in patients younger than 15 years were analyzed according to dressing type applied (Jelonet or DuoDERM).; Two hundred forty-eight pediatric burns were analyzed between 1997 and 2007. One hundred thirty-nine patients were treated with Jelonet dressings, and 109 were treated with DuoDERM. Debridement and grafting were required in 60 (43%) of the Jelonet patients compared with 10 (9%) of the DuoDERM patients (P < .05). The DuoDERM-managed patients maintained a significantly lower graft rate on subanalysis of scalds excluding early grafting within 5 days (P < .001).; Observational evidence suggests that DuoDERM leads to less operative intervention and should be preferentially used in pediatric burns.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
INTRODUCTION: Partial-thickness scalds are the most common pediatric burn injury, and primary management consists of wound dressings to optimize the environment for reepithelialization. Operative intervention is reserved for burns that fail to heal using conservative methods. Worldwide, paraffin-based gauze (Jelonet) is the most common burn dressing; but literature suggests that it adheres to wounds and requires more frequent dressing change that may traumatize newly epithelialized surfaces. Hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM) provide an occlusive moist environment to optimize healing and are associated with less frequent dressing changes. AIM: The aim of the study was to retrospectively analyze pediatric burns in a single tertiary referral center over a 10-year period comparing the impact of Jelonet and DuoDERM dressings relative to operative intervention rates. METHODS: All pediatric burns admitted between 1997 and 2007 were identified using the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry system. Demographics were collected from hospital records and theater logbooks. Acute, partial-thickness burns in patients younger than 15 years were analyzed according to dressing type applied (Jelonet or DuoDERM). RESULTS: Two hundred forty-eight pediatric burns were analyzed between 1997 and 2007. One hundred thirty-nine patients were treated with Jelonet dressings, and 109 were treated with DuoDERM. Debridement and grafting were required in 60 (43%) of the Jelonet patients compared with 10 (9%) of the DuoDERM patients (P < .05). The DuoDERM-managed patients maintained a significantly lower graft rate on subanalysis of scalds excluding early grafting within 5 days (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Observational evidence suggests that DuoDERM leads to less operative intervention and should be preferentially used in pediatric burns.
MeSH:
Adolescent; Bandages; Bandages, Hydrocolloid; Burns; Child; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Debridement; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Injury Severity Score; Length of Stay; Male; Pain Measurement; Petrolatum; Probability; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Skin Transplantation; Treatment Outcome; Wound Healing
ISSN:
1531-5037

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Fiachra Ten
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, John Ben
dc.contributor.authorRegan, Padraic Jen
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, Jacken
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jack Len
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-05T13:08:14Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-05T13:08:14Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.citationHydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates. 2010, 45 (3):600-5 J. Pediatr. Surg.en
dc.identifier.issn1531-5037-
dc.identifier.pmid20223327-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2009.09.037-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/144013-
dc.descriptionINTRODUCTION: Partial-thickness scalds are the most common pediatric burn injury, and primary management consists of wound dressings to optimize the environment for reepithelialization. Operative intervention is reserved for burns that fail to heal using conservative methods. Worldwide, paraffin-based gauze (Jelonet) is the most common burn dressing; but literature suggests that it adheres to wounds and requires more frequent dressing change that may traumatize newly epithelialized surfaces. Hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM) provide an occlusive moist environment to optimize healing and are associated with less frequent dressing changes. AIM: The aim of the study was to retrospectively analyze pediatric burns in a single tertiary referral center over a 10-year period comparing the impact of Jelonet and DuoDERM dressings relative to operative intervention rates. METHODS: All pediatric burns admitted between 1997 and 2007 were identified using the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry system. Demographics were collected from hospital records and theater logbooks. Acute, partial-thickness burns in patients younger than 15 years were analyzed according to dressing type applied (Jelonet or DuoDERM). RESULTS: Two hundred forty-eight pediatric burns were analyzed between 1997 and 2007. One hundred thirty-nine patients were treated with Jelonet dressings, and 109 were treated with DuoDERM. Debridement and grafting were required in 60 (43%) of the Jelonet patients compared with 10 (9%) of the DuoDERM patients (P < .05). The DuoDERM-managed patients maintained a significantly lower graft rate on subanalysis of scalds excluding early grafting within 5 days (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Observational evidence suggests that DuoDERM leads to less operative intervention and should be preferentially used in pediatric burns.en
dc.description.abstractPartial-thickness scalds are the most common pediatric burn injury, and primary management consists of wound dressings to optimize the environment for reepithelialization. Operative intervention is reserved for burns that fail to heal using conservative methods. Worldwide, paraffin-based gauze (Jelonet) is the most common burn dressing; but literature suggests that it adheres to wounds and requires more frequent dressing change that may traumatize newly epithelialized surfaces. Hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM) provide an occlusive moist environment to optimize healing and are associated with less frequent dressing changes.-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to retrospectively analyze pediatric burns in a single tertiary referral center over a 10-year period comparing the impact of Jelonet and DuoDERM dressings relative to operative intervention rates.-
dc.description.abstractAll pediatric burns admitted between 1997 and 2007 were identified using the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry system. Demographics were collected from hospital records and theater logbooks. Acute, partial-thickness burns in patients younger than 15 years were analyzed according to dressing type applied (Jelonet or DuoDERM).-
dc.description.abstractTwo hundred forty-eight pediatric burns were analyzed between 1997 and 2007. One hundred thirty-nine patients were treated with Jelonet dressings, and 109 were treated with DuoDERM. Debridement and grafting were required in 60 (43%) of the Jelonet patients compared with 10 (9%) of the DuoDERM patients (P < .05). The DuoDERM-managed patients maintained a significantly lower graft rate on subanalysis of scalds excluding early grafting within 5 days (P < .001).-
dc.description.abstractObservational evidence suggests that DuoDERM leads to less operative intervention and should be preferentially used in pediatric burns.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022346809007787en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshBandages-
dc.subject.meshBandages, Hydrocolloid-
dc.subject.meshBurns-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshDebridement-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshInjury Severity Score-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement-
dc.subject.meshPetrolatum-
dc.subject.meshProbability-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment-
dc.subject.meshSkin Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.subject.meshWound Healing-
dc.titleHydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. fiachra1978@yahoo.comen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pediatric surgeryen
dc.description.provinceConnacht-
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