A Guyon's canal ganglion presenting as occupational overuse syndrome: A case report.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143812
Title:
A Guyon's canal ganglion presenting as occupational overuse syndrome: A case report.
Authors:
Chan, Jeffrey C Y; Tiong, William H; Hennessy, Michael J; Kelly, John L
Affiliation:
Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, University Hospital Galway, Galway, Ireland. chancy@eircom.net
Citation:
A Guyon's canal ganglion presenting as occupational overuse syndrome: A case report. 2008, 3:4 J Brachial Plex Peripher Nerve Inj
Journal:
Journal of brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injury
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143812
DOI:
10.1186/1749-7221-3-4
PubMed ID:
18269753
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2275269/?tool=pubmed
Abstract:
Occupational overuse syndrome (OOS) can present as Guyon's canal syndrome in computer keyboard users. We report a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a ganglion in a computer user that was misdiagnosed as OOS.; A 54-year-old female secretary was referred with a six-month history of right little finger weakness and difficulty with adduction. Prior to her referral, she was diagnosed by her general practitioner and physiotherapist with a right ulnar nerve neuropraxia at the level of the Guyon's canal. This was thought to be secondary to computer keyboard use and direct pressure exerted on a wrist support. There was obvious atrophy of the hypothenar eminence and the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Both Froment's and Wartenberg's signs were positive. A nerve conduction study revealed that both the abductor digiti minimi and the first dorsal interosseus muscles showed prolonged motor latency. Ulnar conduction across the right elbow was normal. Ulnar sensory amplitude across the right wrist to the fifth digit was reduced while the dorsal cutaneous nerve response was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the right wrist showed a ganglion in Guyon's canal. Decompression of the Guyon's canal was performed and histological examination confirmed a ganglion. The patient's symptoms and signs resolved completely at four-month follow-up.; Clinical history, occupational history and examination alone could potentially lead to misdiagnosis of OOS when a computer user presents with these symptoms and we recommend that nerve conduction or imaging studies be performed.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: Occupational overuse syndrome (OOS) can present as Guyon's canal syndrome in computer keyboard users. We report a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a ganglion in a computer user that was misdiagnosed as OOS. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old female secretary was referred with a six-month history of right little finger weakness and difficulty with adduction. Prior to her referral, she was diagnosed by her general practitioner and physiotherapist with a right ulnar nerve neuropraxia at the level of the Guyon's canal. This was thought to be secondary to computer keyboard use and direct pressure exerted on a wrist support. There was obvious atrophy of the hypothenar eminence and the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Both Froment's and Wartenberg's signs were positive. A nerve conduction study revealed that both the abductor digiti minimi and the first dorsal interosseus muscles showed prolonged motor latency. Ulnar conduction across the right elbow was normal. Ulnar sensory amplitude across the right wrist to the fifth digit was reduced while the dorsal cutaneous nerve response was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the right wrist showed a ganglion in Guyon's canal. Decompression of the Guyon's canal was performed and histological examination confirmed a ganglion. The patient's symptoms and signs resolved completely at four-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: Clinical history, occupational history and examination alone could potentially lead to misdiagnosis of OOS when a computer user presents with these symptoms and we recommend that nerve conduction or imaging studies be performed.
ISSN:
1749-7221

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jeffrey C Yen
dc.contributor.authorTiong, William Hen
dc.contributor.authorHennessy, Michael Jen
dc.contributor.authorKelly, John Len
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-03T14:51:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-03T14:51:58Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationA Guyon's canal ganglion presenting as occupational overuse syndrome: A case report. 2008, 3:4 J Brachial Plex Peripher Nerve Injen
dc.identifier.issn1749-7221-
dc.identifier.pmid18269753-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1749-7221-3-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/143812-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Occupational overuse syndrome (OOS) can present as Guyon's canal syndrome in computer keyboard users. We report a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a ganglion in a computer user that was misdiagnosed as OOS. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old female secretary was referred with a six-month history of right little finger weakness and difficulty with adduction. Prior to her referral, she was diagnosed by her general practitioner and physiotherapist with a right ulnar nerve neuropraxia at the level of the Guyon's canal. This was thought to be secondary to computer keyboard use and direct pressure exerted on a wrist support. There was obvious atrophy of the hypothenar eminence and the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Both Froment's and Wartenberg's signs were positive. A nerve conduction study revealed that both the abductor digiti minimi and the first dorsal interosseus muscles showed prolonged motor latency. Ulnar conduction across the right elbow was normal. Ulnar sensory amplitude across the right wrist to the fifth digit was reduced while the dorsal cutaneous nerve response was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the right wrist showed a ganglion in Guyon's canal. Decompression of the Guyon's canal was performed and histological examination confirmed a ganglion. The patient's symptoms and signs resolved completely at four-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: Clinical history, occupational history and examination alone could potentially lead to misdiagnosis of OOS when a computer user presents with these symptoms and we recommend that nerve conduction or imaging studies be performed.en
dc.description.abstractOccupational overuse syndrome (OOS) can present as Guyon's canal syndrome in computer keyboard users. We report a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a ganglion in a computer user that was misdiagnosed as OOS.-
dc.description.abstractA 54-year-old female secretary was referred with a six-month history of right little finger weakness and difficulty with adduction. Prior to her referral, she was diagnosed by her general practitioner and physiotherapist with a right ulnar nerve neuropraxia at the level of the Guyon's canal. This was thought to be secondary to computer keyboard use and direct pressure exerted on a wrist support. There was obvious atrophy of the hypothenar eminence and the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Both Froment's and Wartenberg's signs were positive. A nerve conduction study revealed that both the abductor digiti minimi and the first dorsal interosseus muscles showed prolonged motor latency. Ulnar conduction across the right elbow was normal. Ulnar sensory amplitude across the right wrist to the fifth digit was reduced while the dorsal cutaneous nerve response was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the right wrist showed a ganglion in Guyon's canal. Decompression of the Guyon's canal was performed and histological examination confirmed a ganglion. The patient's symptoms and signs resolved completely at four-month follow-up.-
dc.description.abstractClinical history, occupational history and examination alone could potentially lead to misdiagnosis of OOS when a computer user presents with these symptoms and we recommend that nerve conduction or imaging studies be performed.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2275269/?tool=pubmeden
dc.titleA Guyon's canal ganglion presenting as occupational overuse syndrome: A case report.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, University Hospital Galway, Galway, Ireland. chancy@eircom.neten
dc.identifier.journalJournal of brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuryen
dc.description.provinceConnacht-

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