Amine functionalization of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix with generation 1 PAMAM dendrimer.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143797
Title:
Amine functionalization of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix with generation 1 PAMAM dendrimer.
Authors:
Chan, Jeffrey C Y; Burugapalli, Krishna; Naik, Hemantkumar; Kelly, John L; Pandit, Abhay
Affiliation:
National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland.
Citation:
Amine functionalization of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix with generation 1 PAMAM dendrimer. 2008, 9 (2):528-36 Biomacromolecules
Journal:
Biomacromolecules
Issue Date:
Feb-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143797
DOI:
10.1021/bm701055k
PubMed ID:
18198835
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm701055k
Abstract:
A method to functionalize cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (CEM) with free amine groups was established in an attempt to improve its potential for tethering of bioactive molecules. CEM was incorporated with Generation-1 polyamidoamine (G1 PAMAM) dendrimer by using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide cross-linking system. The nature of incorporation of PAMAM dendrimer was evaluated using shrink temperature measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) assessment, ninhydrin assay, and swellability. The effects of PAMAM incorporation on mechanical and degradation properties of CEM were evaluated using a uniaxial mechanical test and collagenase degradation assay, respectively. Ninhydrin assay and FTIR assessment confirmed the presence of increasing free amine groups with increasing quantity of PAMAM in dendrimer-incorporated CEM (DENCEM) scaffolds. The amount of dendrimer used was found to be critical in controlling scaffold degradation, shrink temperature, and free amine content. Cell culture studies showed that fibroblasts seeded on DENCEM maintained their metabolic activity and ability to proliferate in vitro. In addition, fluorescence cell staining and scanning electron microscopy analysis of cell-seeded DENCEM showed preservation of normal fibroblast morphology and phenotype.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
A method to functionalize cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (CEM) with free amine groups was established in an attempt to improve its potential for tethering of bioactive molecules. CEM was incorporated with Generation-1 polyamidoamine (G1 PAMAM) dendrimer by using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide cross-linking system. The nature of incorporation of PAMAM dendrimer was evaluated using shrink temperature measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) assessment, ninhydrin assay, and swellability. The effects of PAMAM incorporation on mechanical and degradation properties of CEM were evaluated using a uniaxial mechanical test and collagenase degradation assay, respectively. Ninhydrin assay and FTIR assessment confirmed the presence of increasing free amine groups with increasing quantity of PAMAM in dendrimer-incorporated CEM (DENCEM) scaffolds. The amount of dendrimer used was found to be critical in controlling scaffold degradation, shrink temperature, and free amine content. Cell culture studies showed that fibroblasts seeded on DENCEM maintained their metabolic activity and ability to proliferate in vitro. In addition, fluorescence cell staining and scanning electron microscopy analysis of cell-seeded DENCEM showed preservation of normal fibroblast morphology and phenotype.
MeSH:
3T3 Cells; Amines; Animals; Dendrimers; Extracellular Matrix; Gallbladder; Mice; Polyamines; Swine
ISSN:
1526-4602

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jeffrey C Yen
dc.contributor.authorBurugapalli, Krishnaen
dc.contributor.authorNaik, Hemantkumaren
dc.contributor.authorKelly, John Len
dc.contributor.authorPandit, Abhayen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-03T14:57:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-03T14:57:41Z-
dc.date.issued2008-02-
dc.identifier.citationAmine functionalization of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix with generation 1 PAMAM dendrimer. 2008, 9 (2):528-36 Biomacromoleculesen
dc.identifier.issn1526-4602-
dc.identifier.pmid18198835-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/bm701055k-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/143797-
dc.descriptionA method to functionalize cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (CEM) with free amine groups was established in an attempt to improve its potential for tethering of bioactive molecules. CEM was incorporated with Generation-1 polyamidoamine (G1 PAMAM) dendrimer by using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide cross-linking system. The nature of incorporation of PAMAM dendrimer was evaluated using shrink temperature measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) assessment, ninhydrin assay, and swellability. The effects of PAMAM incorporation on mechanical and degradation properties of CEM were evaluated using a uniaxial mechanical test and collagenase degradation assay, respectively. Ninhydrin assay and FTIR assessment confirmed the presence of increasing free amine groups with increasing quantity of PAMAM in dendrimer-incorporated CEM (DENCEM) scaffolds. The amount of dendrimer used was found to be critical in controlling scaffold degradation, shrink temperature, and free amine content. Cell culture studies showed that fibroblasts seeded on DENCEM maintained their metabolic activity and ability to proliferate in vitro. In addition, fluorescence cell staining and scanning electron microscopy analysis of cell-seeded DENCEM showed preservation of normal fibroblast morphology and phenotype.en
dc.description.abstractA method to functionalize cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (CEM) with free amine groups was established in an attempt to improve its potential for tethering of bioactive molecules. CEM was incorporated with Generation-1 polyamidoamine (G1 PAMAM) dendrimer by using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide cross-linking system. The nature of incorporation of PAMAM dendrimer was evaluated using shrink temperature measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) assessment, ninhydrin assay, and swellability. The effects of PAMAM incorporation on mechanical and degradation properties of CEM were evaluated using a uniaxial mechanical test and collagenase degradation assay, respectively. Ninhydrin assay and FTIR assessment confirmed the presence of increasing free amine groups with increasing quantity of PAMAM in dendrimer-incorporated CEM (DENCEM) scaffolds. The amount of dendrimer used was found to be critical in controlling scaffold degradation, shrink temperature, and free amine content. Cell culture studies showed that fibroblasts seeded on DENCEM maintained their metabolic activity and ability to proliferate in vitro. In addition, fluorescence cell staining and scanning electron microscopy analysis of cell-seeded DENCEM showed preservation of normal fibroblast morphology and phenotype.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm701055ken
dc.subject.mesh3T3 Cells-
dc.subject.meshAmines-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshDendrimers-
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix-
dc.subject.meshGallbladder-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshPolyamines-
dc.subject.meshSwine-
dc.titleAmine functionalization of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix with generation 1 PAMAM dendrimer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalBiomacromoleculesen
dc.description.provinceConnacht-

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