An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143788
Title:
An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.
Authors:
Murphy, A D; Healy, C; Purcell, E; Fitzgerald, E; Kelly, J L
Affiliation:
Department of Plastic, Reconstructive & Hand Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway, Ireland. Adrian.murphy@mac.com
Citation:
An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn. 2008, 34 (4):512-5 Burns
Journal:
Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Issue Date:
Jun-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143788
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2007.07.005
PubMed ID:
17945422
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305417907001775
Abstract:
The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.
MeSH:
Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Health; Body Surface Area; Burns; Humans; Professional Practice; Quality of Life; Resuscitation; Resuscitation Orders
ISSN:
0305-4179

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, A Den
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Cen
dc.contributor.authorPurcell, Een
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Een
dc.contributor.authorKelly, J Len
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-03T14:38:06Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-03T14:38:06Z-
dc.date.issued2008-06-
dc.identifier.citationAn assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn. 2008, 34 (4):512-5 Burnsen
dc.identifier.issn0305-4179-
dc.identifier.pmid17945422-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.burns.2007.07.005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/143788-
dc.descriptionThe resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.en
dc.description.abstractThe resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305417907001775en
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Health-
dc.subject.meshBody Surface Area-
dc.subject.meshBurns-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshProfessional Practice-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life-
dc.subject.meshResuscitation-
dc.subject.meshResuscitation Orders-
dc.titleAn assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plastic, Reconstructive & Hand Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway, Ireland. Adrian.murphy@mac.comen
dc.identifier.journalBurns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuriesen
dc.description.provinceConnacht-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.