Scaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143786
Title:
Scaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization.
Authors:
Burugapalli, Krishna; Thapasimuttu, Anilkumar; Chan, Jeffrey C Y; Yao, Li; Brody, Sarah; Kelly, Jack L; Pandit, Abhay
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland.
Citation:
Scaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization. 2007, 8 (3):928-36 Biomacromolecules
Journal:
Biomacromolecules
Issue Date:
Mar-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143786
DOI:
10.1021/bm061088x
PubMed ID:
17309297
Additional Links:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bm061088x
Abstract:
An intact extracellular matrix (ECM) with a mesh-like architecture has been identified in the peri-muscular sub-serosal connective tissue (PSCT) of cholecyst (gallbladder). The PSCT layer of cholecyst wall is isolated by mechanical delamination of other layers and decellularized with a treatment with peracetic acid and ethanol solution (PES) in water to obtain the final matrix, which is referred to as cholecyst-derived ECM (CEM). CEM is cross-linked with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) to demonstrate that the susceptibility of CEM to degradation can be controlled. Quantitative and qualitative macromolecular composition assessments revealed that collagen is the primary structural component of CEM. Elastin is also present. In addition, the ultra-structural studies on CEM reveal the presence of a three-dimensional fibrous mesh-like network structure with similar nanoscale architecture on both mucosal and serosal surfaces. In vitro cell culture studies show that CEM provides a supporting structure for the attachment and proliferation of murine fibroblasts (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CEM is also shown to support the attachment and differentiation of rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12).
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
An intact extracellular matrix (ECM) with a mesh-like architecture has been identified in the peri-muscular sub-serosal connective tissue (PSCT) of cholecyst (gallbladder). The PSCT layer of cholecyst wall is isolated by mechanical delamination of other layers and decellularized with a treatment with peracetic acid and ethanol solution (PES) in water to obtain the final matrix, which is referred to as cholecyst-derived ECM (CEM). CEM is cross-linked with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) to demonstrate that the susceptibility of CEM to degradation can be controlled. Quantitative and qualitative macromolecular composition assessments revealed that collagen is the primary structural component of CEM. Elastin is also present. In addition, the ultra-structural studies on CEM reveal the presence of a three-dimensional fibrous mesh-like network structure with similar nanoscale architecture on both mucosal and serosal surfaces. In vitro cell culture studies show that CEM provides a supporting structure for the attachment and proliferation of murine fibroblasts (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CEM is also shown to support the attachment and differentiation of rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12).
MeSH:
Animals; Connective Tissue; Cross-Linking Reagents; Elastin; Endothelium, Vascular; Extracellular Matrix; Gallbladder; Glutaral; Humans; Mice; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning; NIH 3T3 Cells; PC12 Cells; Rats; Swine
ISSN:
1525-7797

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBurugapalli, Krishnaen
dc.contributor.authorThapasimuttu, Anilkumaren
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jeffrey C Yen
dc.contributor.authorYao, Lien
dc.contributor.authorBrody, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jack Len
dc.contributor.authorPandit, Abhayen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-03T14:26:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-03T14:26:41Z-
dc.date.issued2007-03-
dc.identifier.citationScaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization. 2007, 8 (3):928-36 Biomacromoleculesen
dc.identifier.issn1525-7797-
dc.identifier.pmid17309297-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/bm061088x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/143786-
dc.descriptionAn intact extracellular matrix (ECM) with a mesh-like architecture has been identified in the peri-muscular sub-serosal connective tissue (PSCT) of cholecyst (gallbladder). The PSCT layer of cholecyst wall is isolated by mechanical delamination of other layers and decellularized with a treatment with peracetic acid and ethanol solution (PES) in water to obtain the final matrix, which is referred to as cholecyst-derived ECM (CEM). CEM is cross-linked with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) to demonstrate that the susceptibility of CEM to degradation can be controlled. Quantitative and qualitative macromolecular composition assessments revealed that collagen is the primary structural component of CEM. Elastin is also present. In addition, the ultra-structural studies on CEM reveal the presence of a three-dimensional fibrous mesh-like network structure with similar nanoscale architecture on both mucosal and serosal surfaces. In vitro cell culture studies show that CEM provides a supporting structure for the attachment and proliferation of murine fibroblasts (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CEM is also shown to support the attachment and differentiation of rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12).en
dc.description.abstractAn intact extracellular matrix (ECM) with a mesh-like architecture has been identified in the peri-muscular sub-serosal connective tissue (PSCT) of cholecyst (gallbladder). The PSCT layer of cholecyst wall is isolated by mechanical delamination of other layers and decellularized with a treatment with peracetic acid and ethanol solution (PES) in water to obtain the final matrix, which is referred to as cholecyst-derived ECM (CEM). CEM is cross-linked with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) to demonstrate that the susceptibility of CEM to degradation can be controlled. Quantitative and qualitative macromolecular composition assessments revealed that collagen is the primary structural component of CEM. Elastin is also present. In addition, the ultra-structural studies on CEM reveal the presence of a three-dimensional fibrous mesh-like network structure with similar nanoscale architecture on both mucosal and serosal surfaces. In vitro cell culture studies show that CEM provides a supporting structure for the attachment and proliferation of murine fibroblasts (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CEM is also shown to support the attachment and differentiation of rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12).-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bm061088xen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshConnective Tissue-
dc.subject.meshCross-Linking Reagents-
dc.subject.meshElastin-
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular-
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix-
dc.subject.meshGallbladder-
dc.subject.meshGlutaral-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanning-
dc.subject.meshNIH 3T3 Cells-
dc.subject.meshPC12 Cells-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshSwine-
dc.titleScaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalBiomacromoleculesen
dc.description.provinceConnacht-

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