Generation of a vascularized organoid using skeletal muscle as the inductive source.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143782
Title:
Generation of a vascularized organoid using skeletal muscle as the inductive source.
Authors:
Messina, Aurora; Bortolotto, Susan K; Cassell, Oliver C S; Kelly, Jack; Abberton, Keren M; Morrison, Wayne A
Affiliation:
Bernard O'Brien Institute of Microsurgery, St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia. messinaa@svhm.org.au
Citation:
Generation of a vascularized organoid using skeletal muscle as the inductive source. 2005, 19 (11):1570-2 FASEB J.
Journal:
The FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Issue Date:
Sep-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143782
DOI:
10.1096/fj.04-3241fje
PubMed ID:
16014398
Additional Links:
http://www.fasebj.org/content/early/2005/08/27/fj.04-3241fje.long
Abstract:
The technology required for creating an in vivo microenvironment and a neovasculature that can grow with and service new tissue is lacking, precluding the possibility of engineering complex three-dimensional organs. We have shown that when an arterio-venous (AV) loop is constructed in vivo in the rat groin, and placed inside a semisealed chamber, an extensive functional vasculature is generated. To test whether this unusually angiogenic environment supports the survival and growth of implanted tissue or cells, we inserted various preparations of rat and human skeletal muscle. We show that after 6 weeks incubation of muscle tissue, the chamber filled with predominantly well-vascularized recipient-derived adipose tissue, but some new donor-derived skeletal muscle and connective tissue were also evident. When primary cultured myoblasts were inserted into the chamber with the AV loop, they converted to mature striated muscle fibers. Furthermore, we identify novel adipogenesis-inducing properties of skeletal muscle. This represents the first report of a specific three-dimensional tissue grown on its own vascular supply.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The technology required for creating an in vivo microenvironment and a neovasculature that can grow with and service new tissue is lacking, precluding the possibility of engineering complex three-dimensional organs. We have shown that when an arterio-venous (AV) loop is constructed in vivo in the rat groin, and placed inside a semisealed chamber, an extensive functional vasculature is generated. To test whether this unusually angiogenic environment supports the survival and growth of implanted tissue or cells, we inserted various preparations of rat and human skeletal muscle. We show that after 6 weeks incubation of muscle tissue, the chamber filled with predominantly well-vascularized recipient-derived adipose tissue, but some new donor-derived skeletal muscle and connective tissue were also evident. When primary cultured myoblasts were inserted into the chamber with the AV loop, they converted to mature striated muscle fibers. Furthermore, we identify novel adipogenesis-inducing properties of skeletal muscle. This represents the first report of a specific three-dimensional tissue grown on its own vascular supply.
MeSH:
Adipogenesis; Animals; Humans; Male; Muscle Development; Muscle, Skeletal; Myoblasts; Neovascularization, Physiologic; Organoids; Rats; Rats, Mutant Strains; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Tissue Engineering
ISSN:
1530-6860

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMessina, Auroraen
dc.contributor.authorBortolotto, Susan Ken
dc.contributor.authorCassell, Oliver C Sen
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jacken
dc.contributor.authorAbberton, Keren Men
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Wayne Aen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-03T14:03:36Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-03T14:03:36Z-
dc.date.issued2005-09-
dc.identifier.citationGeneration of a vascularized organoid using skeletal muscle as the inductive source. 2005, 19 (11):1570-2 FASEB J.en
dc.identifier.issn1530-6860-
dc.identifier.pmid16014398-
dc.identifier.doi10.1096/fj.04-3241fje-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/143782-
dc.descriptionThe technology required for creating an in vivo microenvironment and a neovasculature that can grow with and service new tissue is lacking, precluding the possibility of engineering complex three-dimensional organs. We have shown that when an arterio-venous (AV) loop is constructed in vivo in the rat groin, and placed inside a semisealed chamber, an extensive functional vasculature is generated. To test whether this unusually angiogenic environment supports the survival and growth of implanted tissue or cells, we inserted various preparations of rat and human skeletal muscle. We show that after 6 weeks incubation of muscle tissue, the chamber filled with predominantly well-vascularized recipient-derived adipose tissue, but some new donor-derived skeletal muscle and connective tissue were also evident. When primary cultured myoblasts were inserted into the chamber with the AV loop, they converted to mature striated muscle fibers. Furthermore, we identify novel adipogenesis-inducing properties of skeletal muscle. This represents the first report of a specific three-dimensional tissue grown on its own vascular supply.en
dc.description.abstractThe technology required for creating an in vivo microenvironment and a neovasculature that can grow with and service new tissue is lacking, precluding the possibility of engineering complex three-dimensional organs. We have shown that when an arterio-venous (AV) loop is constructed in vivo in the rat groin, and placed inside a semisealed chamber, an extensive functional vasculature is generated. To test whether this unusually angiogenic environment supports the survival and growth of implanted tissue or cells, we inserted various preparations of rat and human skeletal muscle. We show that after 6 weeks incubation of muscle tissue, the chamber filled with predominantly well-vascularized recipient-derived adipose tissue, but some new donor-derived skeletal muscle and connective tissue were also evident. When primary cultured myoblasts were inserted into the chamber with the AV loop, they converted to mature striated muscle fibers. Furthermore, we identify novel adipogenesis-inducing properties of skeletal muscle. This represents the first report of a specific three-dimensional tissue grown on its own vascular supply.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.fasebj.org/content/early/2005/08/27/fj.04-3241fje.longen
dc.subject.meshAdipogenesis-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMuscle Development-
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal-
dc.subject.meshMyoblasts-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Physiologic-
dc.subject.meshOrganoids-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshRats, Mutant Strains-
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawley-
dc.subject.meshTissue Engineering-
dc.titleGeneration of a vascularized organoid using skeletal muscle as the inductive source.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBernard O'Brien Institute of Microsurgery, St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia. messinaa@svhm.org.auen
dc.identifier.journalThe FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biologyen
dc.description.provinceConnacht-

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