Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143563
Title:
Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity
Authors:
Feely, Malachy; Long, A
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE), Louth Integrated Services
Citation:
Vol 16; No.8 Pages 725-737
Publisher:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Journal:
Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/143563
Additional Links:
http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1351-0126
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Depression is a personal, individually experienced and complex phenomenon. People disconnect from their internal and external worlds as they journey with their despair. Psychiatric nurses are in a unique position to support people while they journey with depression through provision of connective care. Abstract This paper presents a theory of connectivity, which was formulated from the findings of a Classical Grounded Theory study that was designed to capture a sample of people's perceptions of living with depression or caring for individuals with depression. Data were collected from: (1) a focus group consisting of people with depression (n= 7), of which five were patients in the community and two were nurses; (2) one-to-one interviews with patients in the community (n= 5) and nurses (n= 5), three of whom had experienced depression from both sides of the caring process; and (3) two `happy accident' focus groups (n= 25; n= 18) comprising of healthcare workers with a shared understanding of depression. Purposeful sampling was used initially. Thereafter, in keeping with one of the key tenets of grounded theory, theoretical sampling was used until theoretical saturation occurred. Data were analysed using the constant comparative approach together with the NVivo qualitative analysis software package. The core category that emerged was `connectivity' relating to the connections and disconnections, which people make in their lives. Six key categories emerged all of which were integrated with the core category. Hence, connectivity provided a significant platform for understanding and responding to the life experience of depression. They were: (1) life encounters on the journey to naming; (2) depression: What's in a name? The silent thief; (3) tentative steps to health care; (4) connective encounters and challenges; (5) connecting with self; and (6) self-connection maintenance. Subsequently, a theory, `Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity', surfaced from the overall findings. We argue that this theory of connectivity provides a framework that people working in the field of holistic treatment and care could use to better understand and respond to the life experience of people living with depression.
Keywords:
DEPRESSION
ISSN:
1351-0126

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFeely, Malachyen
dc.contributor.authorLong, Aen
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-29T14:58:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-29T14:58:22Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationVol 16; No.8 Pages 725-737en
dc.identifier.issn1351-0126-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/143563-
dc.descriptionDepression is a personal, individually experienced and complex phenomenon. People disconnect from their internal and external worlds as they journey with their despair. Psychiatric nurses are in a unique position to support people while they journey with depression through provision of connective care. Abstract This paper presents a theory of connectivity, which was formulated from the findings of a Classical Grounded Theory study that was designed to capture a sample of people's perceptions of living with depression or caring for individuals with depression. Data were collected from: (1) a focus group consisting of people with depression (n= 7), of which five were patients in the community and two were nurses; (2) one-to-one interviews with patients in the community (n= 5) and nurses (n= 5), three of whom had experienced depression from both sides of the caring process; and (3) two `happy accident' focus groups (n= 25; n= 18) comprising of healthcare workers with a shared understanding of depression. Purposeful sampling was used initially. Thereafter, in keeping with one of the key tenets of grounded theory, theoretical sampling was used until theoretical saturation occurred. Data were analysed using the constant comparative approach together with the NVivo qualitative analysis software package. The core category that emerged was `connectivity' relating to the connections and disconnections, which people make in their lives. Six key categories emerged all of which were integrated with the core category. Hence, connectivity provided a significant platform for understanding and responding to the life experience of depression. They were: (1) life encounters on the journey to naming; (2) depression: What's in a name? The silent thief; (3) tentative steps to health care; (4) connective encounters and challenges; (5) connecting with self; and (6) self-connection maintenance. Subsequently, a theory, `Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity', surfaced from the overall findings. We argue that this theory of connectivity provides a framework that people working in the field of holistic treatment and care could use to better understand and respond to the life experience of people living with depression.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1351-0126en
dc.subjectDEPRESSIONen
dc.titleDepression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE), Louth Integrated Servicesen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursingen
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.