The caring reality of family carers: an exploration of the health status of family carers of people with Parkinson’s disease

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141236
Title:
The caring reality of family carers: an exploration of the health status of family carers of people with Parkinson’s disease
Authors:
Stokes, Ann
Affiliation:
Care Alliance Ireland and The Parkinson’s Association of Ireland
Publisher:
Care Alliance Ireland
Issue Date:
Jun-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141236
Additional Links:
http://www.carealliance.ie/
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The contribution made by Family Carers is crucial in enabling sick, disabled and older people to remain in the home. However, many Carers are forced to provide care to family members while being inadequately supported in their role. This research sought to develop a greater understanding of the health status of Family Carers in Ireland. A random sample of 20 Family Carers of people with Parkinson’s disease participated in a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. It was found that the role of the Family Carer was both physically and emotionally demanding, particularly as the person’s condition deteriorated and the caring needs intensified. Providing care had powerful physical impacts with significant changes to daily routines noted. High blood pressure, tiredness, lack of physical energy, back problems and arthritis were seen as consequences of caring. As a result of the physical demands of caring, feelings of loneliness, anxiety and depression were all expressed. Providing care also resulted in significant limitations to personal interests and hobbies. Current periods of respite and state provided home care support were viewed as inadequate by many. Experiences of support from healthcare professionals differed greatly. Family members’ support had an important social inclusion aspect. Current levels of financial assistance were seen as insufficient in meeting the needs of Family Carers. Support received by various non-government organisations (NGOs) was seen as highly beneficial. However, joint support meetings for both Family Carer and care recipient were also problematic. A training programme for Family Carers was singled out as a crucial intervention that would assist Family Carers in building up the necessary physical and emotional skills for providing care to a person with Parkinson’s disease, thus impacting positively on their health status.
Keywords:
CARER; FAMILY SUPPORT
Local subject classification:
PARKINSON'S DISEASE; FAMILY CARERS
Sponsors:
€14,555 Department of Health and Children/National Lottery. Remaining c€15k internal Care Alliance Ireland Funds

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStokes, Annen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-30T11:41:21Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-30T11:41:21Z-
dc.date.issued2010-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/141236-
dc.descriptionThe contribution made by Family Carers is crucial in enabling sick, disabled and older people to remain in the home. However, many Carers are forced to provide care to family members while being inadequately supported in their role. This research sought to develop a greater understanding of the health status of Family Carers in Ireland. A random sample of 20 Family Carers of people with Parkinson’s disease participated in a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. It was found that the role of the Family Carer was both physically and emotionally demanding, particularly as the person’s condition deteriorated and the caring needs intensified. Providing care had powerful physical impacts with significant changes to daily routines noted. High blood pressure, tiredness, lack of physical energy, back problems and arthritis were seen as consequences of caring. As a result of the physical demands of caring, feelings of loneliness, anxiety and depression were all expressed. Providing care also resulted in significant limitations to personal interests and hobbies. Current periods of respite and state provided home care support were viewed as inadequate by many. Experiences of support from healthcare professionals differed greatly. Family members’ support had an important social inclusion aspect. Current levels of financial assistance were seen as insufficient in meeting the needs of Family Carers. Support received by various non-government organisations (NGOs) was seen as highly beneficial. However, joint support meetings for both Family Carer and care recipient were also problematic. A training programme for Family Carers was singled out as a crucial intervention that would assist Family Carers in building up the necessary physical and emotional skills for providing care to a person with Parkinson’s disease, thus impacting positively on their health status.en
dc.description.sponsorship€14,555 Department of Health and Children/National Lottery. Remaining c€15k internal Care Alliance Ireland Funds-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCare Alliance Irelanden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.carealliance.ie/en
dc.subjectCARERen
dc.subjectFAMILY SUPPORTen
dc.subject.otherPARKINSON'S DISEASEen
dc.subject.otherFAMILY CARERSen
dc.titleThe caring reality of family carers: an exploration of the health status of family carers of people with Parkinson’s diseaseen
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentCare Alliance Ireland and The Parkinson’s Association of Irelanden
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