Methods of milk expression for lactating women, a Cochrane systematic review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141108
Title:
Methods of milk expression for lactating women, a Cochrane systematic review
Authors:
Becker, Genevieve E; McCormick, Felicia; Renfrew, Mary J
Citation:
BeckerGE,McCormick FM, RenfrewMJ.Methods of milk expression for lactating women. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2008, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD006170. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006170.pub2.
Publisher:
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141108
DOI:
10.1002/14651858.CD006170.pub2
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clsysrev/articles/CD006170/frame.html
Item Type:
Systematic Review
Language:
en
Description:
Aim: To assess acceptability, effectiveness, safety, milk composition, contamination and costs of methods. Search and review methodology: Trials were sought via databases, publications, personal communication with researchers and with equipment manufacturers. Data extraction, quality assessment and analysis were done by at least two members of the team. Findings: Twelve studies, between 1985 and 2007, met the inclusion criteria of which six (397 mothers) provided data for analyses. These related to infants in neonatal units in the USA, UK, Malaysia, Kenya and Nigeria. A greater total volume of milk in six days after birth was obtained using the electric or foot powered pump tested compared to hand expression, though differences may not be clinically significant. Simultaneous pumping took less time than sequential pumping, though the volume obtained was similar. A relaxation tape appeared to result in a greater volume at one expression. No evidence of difference was found for milk contamination, fat content, breastfeeding at discharge, or prolactin by method. Maternal satisfaction, adverse effects on mothers and economic effects were poorly reported. Conclusions and Implications: The available evidence does not address most questions that mothers who are expressing milk would ask. The studies were few, with small samples sizes and with large standard deviations. The results may not apply to pumps other than the brand tested and in the specific setting. Independently funded research is needed, particularly to include methods that do not have a commercial potential. This review may help to inform practice and thus assist mothers to choose a method of milk expression, if one is needed.
Keywords:
breastfeeding; lactation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Genevieve E; McCormick, Felicia; Renfrew, Mary Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-29T11:32:36Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-29T11:32:36Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationBeckerGE,McCormick FM, RenfrewMJ.Methods of milk expression for lactating women. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2008, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD006170. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006170.pub2.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/14651858.CD006170.pub2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/141108-
dc.descriptionAim: To assess acceptability, effectiveness, safety, milk composition, contamination and costs of methods. Search and review methodology: Trials were sought via databases, publications, personal communication with researchers and with equipment manufacturers. Data extraction, quality assessment and analysis were done by at least two members of the team. Findings: Twelve studies, between 1985 and 2007, met the inclusion criteria of which six (397 mothers) provided data for analyses. These related to infants in neonatal units in the USA, UK, Malaysia, Kenya and Nigeria. A greater total volume of milk in six days after birth was obtained using the electric or foot powered pump tested compared to hand expression, though differences may not be clinically significant. Simultaneous pumping took less time than sequential pumping, though the volume obtained was similar. A relaxation tape appeared to result in a greater volume at one expression. No evidence of difference was found for milk contamination, fat content, breastfeeding at discharge, or prolactin by method. Maternal satisfaction, adverse effects on mothers and economic effects were poorly reported. Conclusions and Implications: The available evidence does not address most questions that mothers who are expressing milk would ask. The studies were few, with small samples sizes and with large standard deviations. The results may not apply to pumps other than the brand tested and in the specific setting. Independently funded research is needed, particularly to include methods that do not have a commercial potential. This review may help to inform practice and thus assist mothers to choose a method of milk expression, if one is needed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCochrane Database of Systematic Reviewsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clsysrev/articles/CD006170/frame.htmlen
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen
dc.subjectlactationen
dc.titleMethods of milk expression for lactating women, a Cochrane systematic reviewen
dc.typeSystematic Reviewen
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