The differential impact of subjective and objective aspects of social engagement on cardiovascular risk factors.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141081
Title:
The differential impact of subjective and objective aspects of social engagement on cardiovascular risk factors.
Authors:
Kamiya, Yumiko; Whelan, Brendan; Timonen, Virpi; Kenny, Rose Anne
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Gerontology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. kamiyay@tcd.ie
Citation:
The differential impact of subjective and objective aspects of social engagement on cardiovascular risk factors. 2010, 10:81 BMC Geriatr
Journal:
BMC geriatrics
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141081
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2318-10-81
PubMed ID:
21044327
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21044327
Abstract:
This article provides new insights into the impact of social engagement on CVD risk factors in older adults. We hypothesized that objective (social participation, social ties and marital status) and subjective (emotional support) aspects of social engagement are independently associated with objective measures of cardiovascular risk.; Data from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA) were analyzed. The effects of social participation, social ties, marital status, and emotional support on hypertension, obesity, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen were estimated by logistic regression controlling for age, sex, education, physical function, depression, cardiovascular disease, other chronic diseases, physical activity, and smoking.; Social participation is a consistent predictor of low risk for four risk factors, even after controlling for a wide range of covariates. Being married is associated with lower risk for hypertension. Social ties and emotional support are not significantly associated with any of the cardiovascular risk factors.; Our analysis suggests that participation in social activities has a stronger association with CV risk factors than marital status, social ties or emotional support. Different forms of social engagement may therefore have different implications for the biological risk factors involved.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cardiovascular Diseases; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Risk Factors; Social Participation; Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors
ISSN:
1471-2318

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKamiya, Yumikoen
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Brendanen
dc.contributor.authorTimonen, Virpien
dc.contributor.authorKenny, Rose Anneen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-29T10:32:20Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-29T10:32:20Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationThe differential impact of subjective and objective aspects of social engagement on cardiovascular risk factors. 2010, 10:81 BMC Geriatren
dc.identifier.issn1471-2318-
dc.identifier.pmid21044327-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2318-10-81-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/141081-
dc.description.abstractThis article provides new insights into the impact of social engagement on CVD risk factors in older adults. We hypothesized that objective (social participation, social ties and marital status) and subjective (emotional support) aspects of social engagement are independently associated with objective measures of cardiovascular risk.-
dc.description.abstractData from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA) were analyzed. The effects of social participation, social ties, marital status, and emotional support on hypertension, obesity, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen were estimated by logistic regression controlling for age, sex, education, physical function, depression, cardiovascular disease, other chronic diseases, physical activity, and smoking.-
dc.description.abstractSocial participation is a consistent predictor of low risk for four risk factors, even after controlling for a wide range of covariates. Being married is associated with lower risk for hypertension. Social ties and emotional support are not significantly associated with any of the cardiovascular risk factors.-
dc.description.abstractOur analysis suggests that participation in social activities has a stronger association with CV risk factors than marital status, social ties or emotional support. Different forms of social engagement may therefore have different implications for the biological risk factors involved.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21044327en
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studies-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSocial Participation-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.titleThe differential impact of subjective and objective aspects of social engagement on cardiovascular risk factors.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Gerontology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. kamiyay@tcd.ieen
dc.identifier.journalBMC geriatricsen

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