A comparison of the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141036
Title:
A comparison of the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings.
Authors:
Hardiman, Sharon; Guerin, Suzanne; Fitzsimons, Elaine
Affiliation:
St. John of God Carmona Services, 111 Upper Glenageary Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
A comparison of the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings., 30 (2):397-407 Res Dev Disabil
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Research in developmental disabilities
Issue Date:
Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/141036
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2008.07.006
PubMed ID:
18760567
Abstract:
This is the first study to compare the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings in the Republic of Ireland. A convenience sample was recruited through two large ID services. The sample comprised 45 children across two groups: Group 1 (n=20; inclusive school) and Group 2 (n=25; segregated school). Parents and teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Adaptive Behaviour Scale-School: 2nd edition. A series of 2 x 2 ANOVAs were carried out on social competence scores using educational placement type (inclusive vs segregated school) and proxy rater (parent vs teacher) as the independent variables. Key findings indicated that children in inclusive schools did not differ significantly from children in segregated schools on the majority of proxy ratings of social competence. This supports the belief that children with intellectual disabilities can function well in different educational settings. Present findings highlight the importance of utilising the functional model of ID when selecting and designing school placements for children with moderate ID.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the first study to compare the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings in the Republic of Ireland. A convenience sample was recruited through two large ID services. The sample comprised 45 children across two groups: Group 1 (n=20; inclusive school) and Group 2 (n=25; segregated school). Parents and teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Adaptive Behaviour Scale-School: 2nd edition. A series of 2 x 2 ANOVAs were carried out on social competence scores using educational placement type (inclusive vs segregated school) and proxy rater (parent vs teacher) as the independent variables. Key findings indicated that children in inclusive schools did not differ significantly from children in segregated schools on the majority of proxy ratings of social competence. This supports the belief that children with intellectual disabilities can function well in different educational settings. Present findings highlight the importance of utilising the functional model of ID when selecting and designing school placements for children with moderate ID.
Keywords:
MODERATE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES; SOCIAL COMPETENCE; INCLUSIVE SCHOOL; SEGREGATED SCHOOL; EDUCATION; INCLUSION; ADAPTATION, PSYCHOLOGICAL; QUESTIONNAIRE; IRELAND
MeSH:
Adaptation, Psychological; Child; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Retardation; Questionnaires; Schools; Social Behavior
ISSN:
1873-3379

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHardiman, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorGuerin, Suzanneen
dc.contributor.authorFitzsimons, Elaineen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-29T09:22:16Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-29T09:22:16Z-
dc.date.issued2009-03-
dc.identifier.citationA comparison of the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings., 30 (2):397-407 Res Dev Disabilen
dc.identifier.issn1873-3379-
dc.identifier.pmid18760567-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ridd.2008.07.006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/141036-
dc.descriptionThis is the first study to compare the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings in the Republic of Ireland. A convenience sample was recruited through two large ID services. The sample comprised 45 children across two groups: Group 1 (n=20; inclusive school) and Group 2 (n=25; segregated school). Parents and teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Adaptive Behaviour Scale-School: 2nd edition. A series of 2 x 2 ANOVAs were carried out on social competence scores using educational placement type (inclusive vs segregated school) and proxy rater (parent vs teacher) as the independent variables. Key findings indicated that children in inclusive schools did not differ significantly from children in segregated schools on the majority of proxy ratings of social competence. This supports the belief that children with intellectual disabilities can function well in different educational settings. Present findings highlight the importance of utilising the functional model of ID when selecting and designing school placements for children with moderate ID.en
dc.description.abstractThis is the first study to compare the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings in the Republic of Ireland. A convenience sample was recruited through two large ID services. The sample comprised 45 children across two groups: Group 1 (n=20; inclusive school) and Group 2 (n=25; segregated school). Parents and teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Adaptive Behaviour Scale-School: 2nd edition. A series of 2 x 2 ANOVAs were carried out on social competence scores using educational placement type (inclusive vs segregated school) and proxy rater (parent vs teacher) as the independent variables. Key findings indicated that children in inclusive schools did not differ significantly from children in segregated schools on the majority of proxy ratings of social competence. This supports the belief that children with intellectual disabilities can function well in different educational settings. Present findings highlight the importance of utilising the functional model of ID when selecting and designing school placements for children with moderate ID.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectMODERATE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIESen
dc.subjectSOCIAL COMPETENCEen
dc.subjectINCLUSIVE SCHOOLen
dc.subjectSEGREGATED SCHOOLen
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen
dc.subjectINCLUSIONen
dc.subjectADAPTATION, PSYCHOLOGICALen
dc.subjectQUESTIONNAIREen
dc.subjectIRELANDen
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMental Retardation-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshSchools-
dc.subject.meshSocial Behavior-
dc.titleA comparison of the social competence of children with moderate intellectual disability in inclusive versus segregated school settings.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSt. John of God Carmona Services, 111 Upper Glenageary Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalResearch in developmental disabilitiesen
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