A systematic review of laparoscopic port site hernias in gastrointestinal surgery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/139830
Title:
A systematic review of laparoscopic port site hernias in gastrointestinal surgery.
Authors:
Owens, M; Barry, M; Janjua, A Z; Winter, D C
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
A systematic review of laparoscopic port site hernias in gastrointestinal surgery. 2011, 9 (4):218-24 Surgeon
Journal:
The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Issue Date:
Aug-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/139830
DOI:
10.1016/j.surge.2011.01.003
PubMed ID:
21672662
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21672662
Abstract:
Port site hernia is an important yet under-recognised complication of laparoscopic surgery, which carries a high risk of strangulation due to the small size of the defect involved. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence, classification, and pathogenesis of this complication, and to evaluate strategies to prevent and treat it.; Medline was searched using the words "port site hernia", "laparoscopic port hernia" "laparoscopic complications" and "trocar site hernias". The search was limited to articles on cholecystectomy, colorectal, bariatric or anti-reflux surgery published in English. A total of 42 articles were analysed and of these 35 were deemed eligible for review. Inclusion criteria were laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in English only with reported incidence of port site herniation. Studies were excluded if insufficient data was provided. Eligible studies were also cross-referenced.; Analysis of 11,699 patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrointestinal procedures demonstrated an incidence of port site hernias of 0.74% with a mean follow-up of 23.9 months. The lowest incidence of port site herniation was for bariatric surgery with 0.57% in 2644 patients with a mean follow-up of 67.4 months while the highest incidence was for laparoscopic colorectal surgery with an incidence of 1.47% in 477 patients with a mean follow-up of 71.5 months.; All fascial defects larger than or equal to 10mm should be closed with peritoneum, while smaller defects may require closure in certain circumstances to prevent herniation. Laparoscopic port site herniation is a completely preventable cause of morbidity that requires a second surgical procedure to repair.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Hernia, Ventral; Humans; Incidence; Laparoscopes; Laparoscopy; Risk Factors; United States
ISSN:
1479-666X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Men
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Men
dc.contributor.authorJanjua, A Zen
dc.contributor.authorWinter, D Cen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-16T13:45:03Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-16T13:45:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-
dc.identifier.citationA systematic review of laparoscopic port site hernias in gastrointestinal surgery. 2011, 9 (4):218-24 Surgeonen
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X-
dc.identifier.pmid21672662-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surge.2011.01.003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/139830-
dc.description.abstractPort site hernia is an important yet under-recognised complication of laparoscopic surgery, which carries a high risk of strangulation due to the small size of the defect involved. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence, classification, and pathogenesis of this complication, and to evaluate strategies to prevent and treat it.-
dc.description.abstractMedline was searched using the words "port site hernia", "laparoscopic port hernia" "laparoscopic complications" and "trocar site hernias". The search was limited to articles on cholecystectomy, colorectal, bariatric or anti-reflux surgery published in English. A total of 42 articles were analysed and of these 35 were deemed eligible for review. Inclusion criteria were laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in English only with reported incidence of port site herniation. Studies were excluded if insufficient data was provided. Eligible studies were also cross-referenced.-
dc.description.abstractAnalysis of 11,699 patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrointestinal procedures demonstrated an incidence of port site hernias of 0.74% with a mean follow-up of 23.9 months. The lowest incidence of port site herniation was for bariatric surgery with 0.57% in 2644 patients with a mean follow-up of 67.4 months while the highest incidence was for laparoscopic colorectal surgery with an incidence of 1.47% in 477 patients with a mean follow-up of 71.5 months.-
dc.description.abstractAll fascial defects larger than or equal to 10mm should be closed with peritoneum, while smaller defects may require closure in certain circumstances to prevent herniation. Laparoscopic port site herniation is a completely preventable cause of morbidity that requires a second surgical procedure to repair.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21672662en
dc.subject.meshHernia, Ventral-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopes-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshUnited States-
dc.titleA systematic review of laparoscopic port site hernias in gastrointestinal surgery.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalThe surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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