Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/139369
Title:
Irish views on death and dying: a national survey.
Authors:
McCarthy, Joan; Weafer, John; Loughrey, Mark
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. j.mccarthy@ucc.ie
Citation:
Irish views on death and dying: a national survey. 2010, 36 (8):454-8 J Med Ethics
Journal:
Journal of medical ethics
Issue Date:
Aug-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/139369
DOI:
10.1136/jme.2009.032615
PubMed ID:
20663762
Abstract:
To determine the public's understanding of and views about a range of ethical issues in relation to death and dying.; Random, digit-dialing, telephone interview; Ireland.; 667 adult individuals.; The general public are unfamiliar with terms associated with end-of-life care. Although most want to be informed if they have a terminal illness, they also value family support in this regard. Most of the respondents believe that competent patients have the right to refuse life-saving treatment. Most also (mistakenly) believe that families, either alone or with physicians, have the authority to make decisions about starting or stopping treatment for incompetent patients. Most Irish people are more concerned about the quality of their dying than death itself. Religious commitment is important to most Irish people, and this impacts on their views about medical treatment and care at the end of life.; The study paints a picture of a general public that is not very comfortable with or informed about the processes of dying and death. Great sensitivity is required of health professionals who must negotiate the timing and the context of breaking of bad news with patients and families. Educational interventions, public and organisational policies and legislation need to address the uncertainty that surrounds the role of professionals and families in making decisions for dying patients.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE:To determine the public's understanding of and views about a range of ethical issues in relation to death and dying. DESIGN:Random, digit-dialing, telephone interview SETTING:Ireland. PARTICIPANTS:667 adult individuals. RESULTS: The general public are unfamiliar with terms associated with end-of-life care. Although most want to be informed if they have a terminal illness, they also value family support in this regard. Most of the respondents believe that competent patients have the right to refuse life-saving treatment. Most also (mistakenly) believe that families, either alone or with physicians, have the authority to make decisions about starting or stopping treatment for incompetent patients. Most Irish people are more concerned about the quality of their dying than death itself. Religious commitment is important to most Irish people, and this impacts on their views about medical treatment and care at the end of life. CONCLUSIONS:The study paints a picture of a general public that is not very comfortable with or informed about the processes of dying and death. Great sensitivity is required of health professionals who must negotiate the timing and the context of breaking of bad news with patients and families. Educational interventions, public and organisational policies and legislation need to address the uncertainty that surrounds the role of professionals and families in making decisions for dying patients.
Keywords:
MORTALITY
Local subject classification:
ATTITUDE
ISSN:
1473-4257
Sponsors:
Irish Hospice Foundation

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Joanen
dc.contributor.authorWeafer, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorLoughrey, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-10T15:49:16Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-10T15:49:16Z-
dc.date.issued2010-08-
dc.identifier.citationIrish views on death and dying: a national survey. 2010, 36 (8):454-8 J Med Ethicsen
dc.identifier.issn1473-4257-
dc.identifier.pmid20663762-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jme.2009.032615-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/139369-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE:To determine the public's understanding of and views about a range of ethical issues in relation to death and dying. DESIGN:Random, digit-dialing, telephone interview SETTING:Ireland. PARTICIPANTS:667 adult individuals. RESULTS: The general public are unfamiliar with terms associated with end-of-life care. Although most want to be informed if they have a terminal illness, they also value family support in this regard. Most of the respondents believe that competent patients have the right to refuse life-saving treatment. Most also (mistakenly) believe that families, either alone or with physicians, have the authority to make decisions about starting or stopping treatment for incompetent patients. Most Irish people are more concerned about the quality of their dying than death itself. Religious commitment is important to most Irish people, and this impacts on their views about medical treatment and care at the end of life. CONCLUSIONS:The study paints a picture of a general public that is not very comfortable with or informed about the processes of dying and death. Great sensitivity is required of health professionals who must negotiate the timing and the context of breaking of bad news with patients and families. Educational interventions, public and organisational policies and legislation need to address the uncertainty that surrounds the role of professionals and families in making decisions for dying patients.en
dc.description.abstractTo determine the public's understanding of and views about a range of ethical issues in relation to death and dying.-
dc.description.abstractRandom, digit-dialing, telephone interview-
dc.description.abstractIreland.-
dc.description.abstract667 adult individuals.-
dc.description.abstractThe general public are unfamiliar with terms associated with end-of-life care. Although most want to be informed if they have a terminal illness, they also value family support in this regard. Most of the respondents believe that competent patients have the right to refuse life-saving treatment. Most also (mistakenly) believe that families, either alone or with physicians, have the authority to make decisions about starting or stopping treatment for incompetent patients. Most Irish people are more concerned about the quality of their dying than death itself. Religious commitment is important to most Irish people, and this impacts on their views about medical treatment and care at the end of life.-
dc.description.abstractThe study paints a picture of a general public that is not very comfortable with or informed about the processes of dying and death. Great sensitivity is required of health professionals who must negotiate the timing and the context of breaking of bad news with patients and families. Educational interventions, public and organisational policies and legislation need to address the uncertainty that surrounds the role of professionals and families in making decisions for dying patients.-
dc.description.sponsorshipIrish Hospice Foundationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectMORTALITYen
dc.subject.otherATTITUDEen
dc.titleIrish views on death and dying: a national survey.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Nursing and Midwifery, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. j.mccarthy@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of medical ethicsen

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