A comparison of maternal and paternal body mass index in early pregnancy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/139355
Title:
A comparison of maternal and paternal body mass index in early pregnancy.
Authors:
Kelly, Ross; Farah, Nadine; O'Connor, Norah; Kennelly, Mairead; Stuart, Bernard; Turner, Michael J
Affiliation:
UCD Centre for Human Reproduction, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
A comparison of maternal and paternal body mass index in early pregnancy. 2011, 51 (2):147-50 Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol
Journal:
The Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecology
Issue Date:
Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/139355
DOI:
10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01257.x
PubMed ID:
21466517
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21466517
Abstract:
 To determine the body mass index (BMI) and the body composition of fathers-to-be and to compare the findings with those of mothers-to-be during early pregnancy.;  This was a descriptive and comparative study based at a large university teaching hospital. We enrolled men whose partner booked for antenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy during July 2009. The height and weight of both parents-to-be were measured digitally, and BMI was calculated. The body compositions of the couple were analysed using bioelectrical impedance.;  Of 167 fathers-to-be, 14% were obese (BMI > 29.9 kg/m2 ) compared with 16% of mothers-to-be (NS). However, 50% were overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2) ) compared with 26% of mothers-to-be (P < 0.001). This may be explained, in part, because the men were on average two years older than the women, and in the men, BMI increased with age. The men had a lower overall fat percentage (P < 0.001), but their visceral fat was higher than in the women (P < 0.001).;  Our findings show a high level of obesity in fathers-to-be, which has implications not only for the men themselves but also their families. We suggest that public health interventions directed at obesity during pregnancy should include both parents-to-be.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adiposity; Adult; Body Composition; Body Mass Index; Cohort Studies; Fathers; Female; Humans; Male; Mothers; Obesity; Overweight; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Trimester, First
ISSN:
1479-828X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Rossen
dc.contributor.authorFarah, Nadineen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Norahen
dc.contributor.authorKennelly, Maireaden
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Bernarden
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Michael Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-10T15:41:03Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-10T15:41:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-
dc.identifier.citationA comparison of maternal and paternal body mass index in early pregnancy. 2011, 51 (2):147-50 Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecolen
dc.identifier.issn1479-828X-
dc.identifier.pmid21466517-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01257.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/139355-
dc.description.abstract To determine the body mass index (BMI) and the body composition of fathers-to-be and to compare the findings with those of mothers-to-be during early pregnancy.-
dc.description.abstract This was a descriptive and comparative study based at a large university teaching hospital. We enrolled men whose partner booked for antenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy during July 2009. The height and weight of both parents-to-be were measured digitally, and BMI was calculated. The body compositions of the couple were analysed using bioelectrical impedance.-
dc.description.abstract Of 167 fathers-to-be, 14% were obese (BMI > 29.9 kg/m2 ) compared with 16% of mothers-to-be (NS). However, 50% were overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2) ) compared with 26% of mothers-to-be (P < 0.001). This may be explained, in part, because the men were on average two years older than the women, and in the men, BMI increased with age. The men had a lower overall fat percentage (P < 0.001), but their visceral fat was higher than in the women (P < 0.001).-
dc.description.abstract Our findings show a high level of obesity in fathers-to-be, which has implications not only for the men themselves but also their families. We suggest that public health interventions directed at obesity during pregnancy should include both parents-to-be.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21466517en
dc.subject.meshAdiposity-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBody Composition-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshFathers-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMothers-
dc.subject.meshObesity-
dc.subject.meshOverweight-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, First-
dc.titleA comparison of maternal and paternal body mass index in early pregnancy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUCD Centre for Human Reproduction, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.