Psychological family intervention for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/138755
Title:
Psychological family intervention for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.
Authors:
Keogh, Karen M; Smith, Susan M; White, Patricia; McGilloway, Sinead; Kelly, Alan; Gibney, James; O'Dowd, Tom
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Trinity College Dublin, Trinity College Centre for Health Sciences, AMNCH, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. keoghkm@tcd.ie
Citation:
Psychological family intervention for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. 2011, 17 (2):105-13 Am J Manag Care
Journal:
The American journal of managed care
Issue Date:
Feb-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/138755
PubMed ID:
21473660
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21473660
Abstract:
To evaluate the effectiveness of a psychological, family-based intervention to improve diabetes-related outcomes in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.; This study was a randomized controlled trial of a psychological family-based intervention targeted at individuals with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Recruitment and follow-up occurred at specialist diabetes clinics. Patients were randomly allocated to an intervention group (n=60) or a control group (n=61). Poor control was defined as at least 2 of the patient's last 3 glycated hemoglobin (A1C) readings at >8.0%. The intervention consisted of 2 sessions delivered by a health psychologist to the patient and a family member in the patient's home, with a third session involving a 15-minute follow-up telephone call.; At 6-month follow-up, the intervention group reported significantly lower mean A1C levels than the control group (8.4% [SD=0.99%] vs 8.8% [SD=1.36%]; P=.04). The intervention was most effective in those with the poorest control at baseline (A1C>9.5%) (intervention 8.7% [SD=1.16%, n=15] vs control 9.9% [SD=1.31%, n=15]; P=.01). The intervention group also reported statistically significant improvements in beliefs about diabetes, psychological well-being, diet, exercise, and family support.; After participating in a family-based intervention targeting negative and/or inaccurate illness perceptions, patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes showed improvements in A1C levels and other outcomes. Our results suggest that adding a psychological, family-based component to usual diabetes care may help improve diabetes management.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Behavioral Medicine; Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Family Therapy; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; Humans; Hypoglycemic Agents; Intervention Studies; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Patient Education as Topic; Prospective Studies; Socioeconomic Factors; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult
ISSN:
1936-2692

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, Karen Men
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Susan Men
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.authorMcGilloway, Sineaden
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Alanen
dc.contributor.authorGibney, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorO'Dowd, Tomen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-03T14:46:16Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-03T14:46:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-02-
dc.identifier.citationPsychological family intervention for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. 2011, 17 (2):105-13 Am J Manag Careen
dc.identifier.issn1936-2692-
dc.identifier.pmid21473660-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/138755-
dc.description.abstractTo evaluate the effectiveness of a psychological, family-based intervention to improve diabetes-related outcomes in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.-
dc.description.abstractThis study was a randomized controlled trial of a psychological family-based intervention targeted at individuals with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Recruitment and follow-up occurred at specialist diabetes clinics. Patients were randomly allocated to an intervention group (n=60) or a control group (n=61). Poor control was defined as at least 2 of the patient's last 3 glycated hemoglobin (A1C) readings at >8.0%. The intervention consisted of 2 sessions delivered by a health psychologist to the patient and a family member in the patient's home, with a third session involving a 15-minute follow-up telephone call.-
dc.description.abstractAt 6-month follow-up, the intervention group reported significantly lower mean A1C levels than the control group (8.4% [SD=0.99%] vs 8.8% [SD=1.36%]; P=.04). The intervention was most effective in those with the poorest control at baseline (A1C>9.5%) (intervention 8.7% [SD=1.16%, n=15] vs control 9.9% [SD=1.31%, n=15]; P=.01). The intervention group also reported statistically significant improvements in beliefs about diabetes, psychological well-being, diet, exercise, and family support.-
dc.description.abstractAfter participating in a family-based intervention targeting negative and/or inaccurate illness perceptions, patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes showed improvements in A1C levels and other outcomes. Our results suggest that adding a psychological, family-based component to usual diabetes care may help improve diabetes management.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21473660en
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshBehavioral Medicine-
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose Self-Monitoring-
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2-
dc.subject.meshFamily Therapy-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice-
dc.subject.meshHemoglobin A, Glycosylated-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypoglycemic Agents-
dc.subject.meshIntervention Studies-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topic-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titlePsychological family intervention for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public Health and Primary Care, Trinity College Dublin, Trinity College Centre for Health Sciences, AMNCH, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. keoghkm@tcd.ieen
dc.identifier.journalThe American journal of managed careen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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