Aspergillus/allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in an Irish cystic fibrosis population: a diagnostically challenging entity.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136794
Title:
Aspergillus/allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in an Irish cystic fibrosis population: a diagnostically challenging entity.
Authors:
Chotirmall, Sanjay Haresh; Branagan, Peter; Gunaratnam, Cedric; McElvaney, Noel Gerard
Affiliation:
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital. Dublin 1, Republic of Ireland. sanjaychotirmall@hotmail.com
Citation:
Aspergillus/allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in an Irish cystic fibrosis population: a diagnostically challenging entity. 2008, 53 (8):1035-41 Respir Care
Journal:
Respiratory care
Issue Date:
Aug-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136794
PubMed ID:
18655741
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18655741
Abstract:
Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) can become colonized by aspergillus, which can act as an allergen and cause allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA).; To determine the rate of aspergillus colonization and ABPA in a population of Irish patients with CF.; In 50 consecutive patients with CF who presented with exacerbations, we looked for the presence of aspergillus in their sputum and signs and symptoms of ABPA.; Fifteen patients (30%) grew aspergillus species in their sputum cultures. Six patients (12%) had ABPA. Matched for age, sex, genotype, and microbiology, there was no significant difference in forced expiratory volume in the first second (percent predicted, FEV(1)%) in subjects with aspergillus-positive sputum compared to those not colonized with aspergillus. Subjects with ABPA experienced sharp short-term deterioration in lung function (mean 6.7% predicted FEV(1)), which returned to baseline following at least 4 weeks of treatment.; The prevalence of ABPA was 12%. Aspergillus-positive sputum of itself was not a poor prognostic sign in terms of lung function over the 5-year study course. ABPA produces short-term reversible declines in lung function and responds to treatment. The frequency of aspergillus isolates did not correlate with the occurrence of ABPA. A low threshold for the diagnosis of ABPA should be maintained in any patient with CF who does not improve with antibiotics.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Antifungal Agents; Aspergillosis; Case-Control Studies; Cohort Studies; Cystic Fibrosis; Female; Glucocorticoids; Humans; Ireland; Lung Diseases, Fungal; Male; Sputum; Young Adult
ISSN:
0020-1324

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChotirmall, Sanjay Hareshen
dc.contributor.authorBranagan, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorGunaratnam, Cedricen
dc.contributor.authorMcElvaney, Noel Gerarden
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-25T08:36:16Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-25T08:36:16Z-
dc.date.issued2008-08-
dc.identifier.citationAspergillus/allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in an Irish cystic fibrosis population: a diagnostically challenging entity. 2008, 53 (8):1035-41 Respir Careen
dc.identifier.issn0020-1324-
dc.identifier.pmid18655741-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/136794-
dc.description.abstractPatients with cystic fibrosis (CF) can become colonized by aspergillus, which can act as an allergen and cause allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA).-
dc.description.abstractTo determine the rate of aspergillus colonization and ABPA in a population of Irish patients with CF.-
dc.description.abstractIn 50 consecutive patients with CF who presented with exacerbations, we looked for the presence of aspergillus in their sputum and signs and symptoms of ABPA.-
dc.description.abstractFifteen patients (30%) grew aspergillus species in their sputum cultures. Six patients (12%) had ABPA. Matched for age, sex, genotype, and microbiology, there was no significant difference in forced expiratory volume in the first second (percent predicted, FEV(1)%) in subjects with aspergillus-positive sputum compared to those not colonized with aspergillus. Subjects with ABPA experienced sharp short-term deterioration in lung function (mean 6.7% predicted FEV(1)), which returned to baseline following at least 4 weeks of treatment.-
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of ABPA was 12%. Aspergillus-positive sputum of itself was not a poor prognostic sign in terms of lung function over the 5-year study course. ABPA produces short-term reversible declines in lung function and responds to treatment. The frequency of aspergillus isolates did not correlate with the occurrence of ABPA. A low threshold for the diagnosis of ABPA should be maintained in any patient with CF who does not improve with antibiotics.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18655741en
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAntifungal Agents-
dc.subject.meshAspergillosis-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshCystic Fibrosis-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGlucocorticoids-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLung Diseases, Fungal-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshSputum-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleAspergillus/allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in an Irish cystic fibrosis population: a diagnostically challenging entity.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital. Dublin 1, Republic of Ireland. sanjaychotirmall@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory careen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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