Emergence of MRSA in positive blood cultures from patients with febrile neutropenia--a cause for concern.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136788
Title:
Emergence of MRSA in positive blood cultures from patients with febrile neutropenia--a cause for concern.
Authors:
Morris, Patrick G; Hassan, Tidi; McNamara, Mairead; Hassan, Astrid; Wiig, Rebecca; Grogan, Liam; Breathnach, Oscar S; Smyth, Edmond; Humphreys, Hilary
Affiliation:
Department of Oncology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Emergence of MRSA in positive blood cultures from patients with febrile neutropenia--a cause for concern. 2008, 16 (9):1085-8 Support Care Cancer
Journal:
Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Issue Date:
Sep-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136788
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-007-0398-5
PubMed ID:
18274787
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18274787
Abstract:
Febrile neutropenia (FN) causes considerable morbidity in patients on cytotoxic chemotherapy. Recently, there has been a trend towards fewer Gram-negative and more Gram-positive infections with increasing antibiotic resistance. To assess these patterns, data from a supra-regional cancer centre in Ireland were reviewed.; A 5-year review of all positive blood cultures in patients undergoing anti-cancer chemotherapy was carried out.; Eight hundred and ninety-four patients were reviewed. The mean incidence of FN was 64.2 cases per year. Eight hundred and forty-six blood culture specimens were taken and 173 (20.4%) were culture positive. The isolated organisms were Gram positive (71.1%), Gram negative (27.8%) and fungal (1.1%). Of the Gram-positive organisms, 75.6% were staphylococci. Of these, 67.8% were coagulase-negative staphylococci and 30.1% were Staphylococci aureus. Amongst the S. aureus, 89.3% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were not identified as a cause of positive blood cultures.; Amongst patients with cancer who develop FN in our hospital, Gram-positive bacteria account for the largest proportion. The high proportion of MRSA as a cause of positive blood cultures is of concern.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Antineoplastic Agents; Cerebrospinal Fluid; Fever; Hematologic Tests; Humans; Incidence; Ireland; Methicillin Resistance; Neoplasms; Neutropenia; Oncology Service, Hospital; Retrospective Studies; Staphylococcal Infections; Vancomycin Resistance
ISSN:
0941-4355

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Patrick Gen
dc.contributor.authorHassan, Tidien
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Maireaden
dc.contributor.authorHassan, Astriden
dc.contributor.authorWiig, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Liamen
dc.contributor.authorBreathnach, Oscar Sen
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Edmonden
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, Hilaryen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-25T08:38:33Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-25T08:38:33Z-
dc.date.issued2008-09-
dc.identifier.citationEmergence of MRSA in positive blood cultures from patients with febrile neutropenia--a cause for concern. 2008, 16 (9):1085-8 Support Care Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0941-4355-
dc.identifier.pmid18274787-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-007-0398-5-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/136788-
dc.description.abstractFebrile neutropenia (FN) causes considerable morbidity in patients on cytotoxic chemotherapy. Recently, there has been a trend towards fewer Gram-negative and more Gram-positive infections with increasing antibiotic resistance. To assess these patterns, data from a supra-regional cancer centre in Ireland were reviewed.-
dc.description.abstractA 5-year review of all positive blood cultures in patients undergoing anti-cancer chemotherapy was carried out.-
dc.description.abstractEight hundred and ninety-four patients were reviewed. The mean incidence of FN was 64.2 cases per year. Eight hundred and forty-six blood culture specimens were taken and 173 (20.4%) were culture positive. The isolated organisms were Gram positive (71.1%), Gram negative (27.8%) and fungal (1.1%). Of the Gram-positive organisms, 75.6% were staphylococci. Of these, 67.8% were coagulase-negative staphylococci and 30.1% were Staphylococci aureus. Amongst the S. aureus, 89.3% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were not identified as a cause of positive blood cultures.-
dc.description.abstractAmongst patients with cancer who develop FN in our hospital, Gram-positive bacteria account for the largest proportion. The high proportion of MRSA as a cause of positive blood cultures is of concern.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18274787en
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshCerebrospinal Fluid-
dc.subject.meshFever-
dc.subject.meshHematologic Tests-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMethicillin Resistance-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeutropenia-
dc.subject.meshOncology Service, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcal Infections-
dc.subject.meshVancomycin Resistance-
dc.titleEmergence of MRSA in positive blood cultures from patients with febrile neutropenia--a cause for concern.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Oncology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalSupportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Canceren
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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