Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136777
Title:
Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study.
Authors:
Shortt, C P; Malone, L; Thornton, J; Brennan, P; Lee, M J
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study. 2008, 52 (4):365-9 J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol
Journal:
Journal of medical imaging and radiation oncology
Issue Date:
Aug-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136777
DOI:
10.1111/j.1440-1673.2008.01970.x
PubMed ID:
18811760
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18811760
Abstract:
We measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Bismuth; Cerebral Angiography; Eye Diseases; Humans; Lead; Phantoms, Imaging; Radiation Dosage; Radiation Injuries; Radiation Protection; Radiometry; Relative Biological Effectiveness; Thyroid Diseases
ISSN:
1754-9485

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShortt, C Pen
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Len
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Jen
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Pen
dc.contributor.authorLee, M Jen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-25T08:33:55Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-25T08:33:55Z-
dc.date.issued2008-08-
dc.identifier.citationRadiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study. 2008, 52 (4):365-9 J Med Imaging Radiat Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn1754-9485-
dc.identifier.pmid18811760-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1673.2008.01970.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/136777-
dc.description.abstractWe measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18811760en
dc.subject.meshBismuth-
dc.subject.meshCerebral Angiography-
dc.subject.meshEye Diseases-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLead-
dc.subject.meshPhantoms, Imaging-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Protection-
dc.subject.meshRadiometry-
dc.subject.meshRelative Biological Effectiveness-
dc.subject.meshThyroid Diseases-
dc.titleRadiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of medical imaging and radiation oncologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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