Prospective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136770
Title:
Prospective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice.
Authors:
Harewood, Gavin C
Affiliation:
Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, harewood.gavin@gmail.com.
Citation:
Prospective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice. 2011:notDig Dis Sci
Journal:
Digestive diseases and sciences
Issue Date:
29-Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136770
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-011-1673-3
PubMed ID:
21445580
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21445580
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1573-2568

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarewood, Gavin Cen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-25T08:27:01Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-25T08:27:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-29-
dc.identifier.citationProspective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice. 2011:notDig Dis Scien
dc.identifier.issn1573-2568-
dc.identifier.pmid21445580-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10620-011-1673-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/136770-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21445580en
dc.titleProspective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, harewood.gavin@gmail.com.en
dc.identifier.journalDigestive diseases and sciencesen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.