Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136769
Title:
Looked after children in Dublin and their mental health needs.
Authors:
McNicholas, F; O'Connor, N; Bandyopadhyay, G; Doyle, P; O'Donovan, A; Belton, M
Affiliation:
Lucena Clinic, 59 Orwell Rd, Rathgar, Dublin 6. fiona.mcnicholas@sjog.ie
Citation:
Looked after children in Dublin and their mental health needs. 2011, 104 (4):105-8 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136769
PubMed ID:
21675091
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=21675091
Abstract:
Children in care in Ireland have increased by 27% in the last decade. This population is recognized to be among the most vulnerable. This study aims to describe their placement histories, service use and mental health needs. Data was obtained on 174 children (56.5% of eligible sample) with a mean age of 10.83 (SD = 5.04). 114 (65.5%) were in care for three years or more. 29 (16.7%) did not have a SW and 49 (37.7%) had no GP 50 (28.7%) were attending CAMHS. Long term care, frequent placement changes and residential setting were significantly related with poorer outcomes and increased MH contact. Given the increase in numbers in care and the overall decrease in resource allocation to health and social care, individual care planning and prioritizing of resources are essential.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Children in care in Ireland have increased by 27% in the last decade. This population is recognized to be among the most vulnerable. This study aims to describe their placement histories, service use and mental health needs. Data was obtained on 174 children (56.5% of eligible sample) with a mean age of 10.83 (SD = 5.04). 114 (65.5%) were in care for three years or more. 29 (16.7%) did not have a SW and 49 (37.7%) had no GP. 50 (28.7%) were attending CAMHS. Long term care, frequent placement changes and residential setting were significantly related with poorer outcomes and increased MH contact. Given the increase in numbers in care and the overall decrease in resource allocation to health and social care, individual care planning and prioritizing of resources are essential.
Keywords:
Looked after children; Children in Care
MeSH:
Adolescent; Child; Child Psychology; Child of Impaired Parents; Child, Preschool; Female; Foster Home Care; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Ireland; Male; Mental Health Services; Residential Facilities; Young Adult
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Fen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Nen
dc.contributor.authorBandyopadhyay, Gen
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Pen
dc.contributor.authorO'Donovan, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBelton, Men
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-25T08:26:19Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-25T08:26:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-
dc.identifier.citationLooked after children in Dublin and their mental health needs. 2011, 104 (4):105-8 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid21675091-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/136769-
dc.descriptionChildren in care in Ireland have increased by 27% in the last decade. This population is recognized to be among the most vulnerable. This study aims to describe their placement histories, service use and mental health needs. Data was obtained on 174 children (56.5% of eligible sample) with a mean age of 10.83 (SD = 5.04). 114 (65.5%) were in care for three years or more. 29 (16.7%) did not have a SW and 49 (37.7%) had no GP. 50 (28.7%) were attending CAMHS. Long term care, frequent placement changes and residential setting were significantly related with poorer outcomes and increased MH contact. Given the increase in numbers in care and the overall decrease in resource allocation to health and social care, individual care planning and prioritizing of resources are essential.en
dc.description.abstractChildren in care in Ireland have increased by 27% in the last decade. This population is recognized to be among the most vulnerable. This study aims to describe their placement histories, service use and mental health needs. Data was obtained on 174 children (56.5% of eligible sample) with a mean age of 10.83 (SD = 5.04). 114 (65.5%) were in care for three years or more. 29 (16.7%) did not have a SW and 49 (37.7%) had no GP 50 (28.7%) were attending CAMHS. Long term care, frequent placement changes and residential setting were significantly related with poorer outcomes and increased MH contact. Given the increase in numbers in care and the overall decrease in resource allocation to health and social care, individual care planning and prioritizing of resources are essential.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=21675091en
dc.subjectLooked after childrenen
dc.subjectChildren in Careen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild Psychology-
dc.subject.meshChild of Impaired Parents-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFoster Home Care-
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Needs and Demand-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMental Health Services-
dc.subject.meshResidential Facilities-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleLooked after children in Dublin and their mental health needs.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLucena Clinic, 59 Orwell Rd, Rathgar, Dublin 6. fiona.mcnicholas@sjog.ieen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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