Defining "Sexualized Challenging Behavior" in Adults With Intellectual Disabilities

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136541
Title:
Defining "Sexualized Challenging Behavior" in Adults With Intellectual Disabilities
Authors:
Lockhart, Karen; Guerin, Suzanne; Shanahan, Sean; Coyle, Kevin
Affiliation:
St John of God North East Services; School of Psychology, University College Dublin; St John of God Kildare Services; St John of God Carmona Services
Citation:
Lockhart, K., Guerin, S., Shanahan, S. and Coyle, K. (2009), Defining “Sexualized Challenging Behavior” in Adults With Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 6: 293–301.
Publisher:
Wiley Periodicals, Inc / IASSID
Journal:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/136541
DOI:
10.1111/j.1741-1130.2009.00235.x
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Inappropriate sexual behaviors are a subset of challenging behaviors that limit the community integration of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Despite the stigmatizing effect of problematic sexual behavior, research efforts in this area have been limited and often used narrow prospective definitions. As such, research has been limited to a focus on "sexual offending" and "abuse," terms which are often criticized in their applicability to people with intellectual disabilities given their connotations of criminal intent or insight. The authors propose adopting the term "sexualized challenging behavior" and define it by using empirical methods. Using a qualitative methodology, they examined a six-month sample of service-based documentation reporting sexual behaviors that were problematic. They also conducted semi-structured interviews with a staff-based sample and explored their views in relation to sexual behavior. Common themes emerged across both documentation and staff interviews regarding the nature and characteristics of such behaviors. Their proposed definition encompasses a continuum of self- and other-directed behaviors related to touch, exposure, and communication, which they view as distinct from sexual offending. The findings further suggest that sexualized challenging behaviors have distinct characteristics that differentiate them from nonsexualized challenging behaviors. The authors conclude that sexualized challenging behaviors can be defined as a distinct class of behaviors that require further study among a broader cohort of adults with intellectual disabilities.
Keywords:
CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR; INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES; SEXUAL BEHAVIOURS; SEXUALITY; STAFF VIEWS
ISSN:
1741-1122
EISSN:
1741-1130

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLockhart, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorGuerin, Suzanneen
dc.contributor.authorShanahan, Seanen
dc.contributor.authorCoyle, Kevinen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-21T16:05:42Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-21T16:05:42Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.citationLockhart, K., Guerin, S., Shanahan, S. and Coyle, K. (2009), Defining “Sexualized Challenging Behavior” in Adults With Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 6: 293–301.-
dc.identifier.issn1741-1122-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1741-1130.2009.00235.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/136541-
dc.descriptionInappropriate sexual behaviors are a subset of challenging behaviors that limit the community integration of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Despite the stigmatizing effect of problematic sexual behavior, research efforts in this area have been limited and often used narrow prospective definitions. As such, research has been limited to a focus on "sexual offending" and "abuse," terms which are often criticized in their applicability to people with intellectual disabilities given their connotations of criminal intent or insight. The authors propose adopting the term "sexualized challenging behavior" and define it by using empirical methods. Using a qualitative methodology, they examined a six-month sample of service-based documentation reporting sexual behaviors that were problematic. They also conducted semi-structured interviews with a staff-based sample and explored their views in relation to sexual behavior. Common themes emerged across both documentation and staff interviews regarding the nature and characteristics of such behaviors. Their proposed definition encompasses a continuum of self- and other-directed behaviors related to touch, exposure, and communication, which they view as distinct from sexual offending. The findings further suggest that sexualized challenging behaviors have distinct characteristics that differentiate them from nonsexualized challenging behaviors. The authors conclude that sexualized challenging behaviors can be defined as a distinct class of behaviors that require further study among a broader cohort of adults with intellectual disabilities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Periodicals, Inc / IASSIDen
dc.subjectCHALLENGING BEHAVIOURen
dc.subjectINTELLECTUAL DISABILITIESen
dc.subjectSEXUAL BEHAVIOURSen
dc.subjectSEXUALITYen
dc.subjectSTAFF VIEWSen
dc.titleDefining "Sexualized Challenging Behavior" in Adults With Intellectual Disabilitiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1741-1130-
dc.contributor.departmentSt John of God North East Services; School of Psychology, University College Dublin; St John of God Kildare Services; St John of God Carmona Servicesen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilitiesen
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